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JxSxPx

About me

I'm Jason. I'm a film, literary and pop culture enthusiast. Got a soft spot and deep love for animation, comics and nerdy things that go in tandem with them.

Lists

Favorite music (101 items)
Music list by JxSxPx
Last updated 20 hours, 56 minutes ago
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Favorite movies (249 items)
Movie list by JxSxPx
Last updated 2 days ago
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VH1’s 100 Greatest Women in Music (100 items)
Person list by JxSxPx
Published 5 years, 4 months ago 3 comments
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Favorite TV Shows (40 items)
Tv list by JxSxPx
Published 6 years, 6 months ago
Favorite Actors & Actresses (100 items)
Person list by JxSxPx
Last updated 7 months, 1 week ago



Recent reviews

All reviews - Movies (568) - TV Shows (54) - Books (3) - Music (118)

Big Hero 6

Posted : 1 week, 3 days ago on 16 April 2015 03:36 (A review of Big Hero 6)

Compared to the more ambitious, artistic, original, and daring works like Song of the Sea and The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, Big Hero 6 doesn’t hold a candle to them and makes for a bland Oscar winner. Taken on its own merits away from that Oscar win, Big Hero 6 is a perfectly charming, funny, warm-hearted film that marries the superhero origin story to one about grief and overcoming loss.

I suppose one could look squarely at former Pixar head John Lasseter’s ascension to head of Walt Disney’s animation department for the sudden upward trajectory of their films. Tangled and Frozen were very enjoyable spins of their respective fairy tales, grafting on to them themes of sisterhood and personal agency in addition to the lively musical scores. Big Hero 6 isn’t a musical, but it’s another solid entry in Lasseter’s tenure as Disney’s overseer.

About as faithful an adaptation as any of Disney’s typical fairy tale fare, which is to say not at all besides a title and some broad strokes, this film sees the House of Mouse dipping into an obscure Marvel comic book for source material. While the comic has ties to the X-Men universe, those have obviously been dropped as a rival studio owns the film rights to that property. Instead, we get a bunch of science-geeks using their intelligence to create gadgets that enable them to perform daring feats.

While the film is overall more playful, and Baymax is one of the lovable standout character of 2014, the narrative attached to the film is muddled and confused, at best. Not only are we witnessing a character deal with the loss of a close relative, we’ve also got several other characters to introduce and many of them get the shaft. Mostly the film’s female characters are regulated to second or third class status.

In addition to having to introduce and develop a large ensemble of characters, we also get the typical superhero origin story beats, a third-act reveal that’s preposterous, and a typical Disney fake-out death that’s just tired at this point. No one really believed that character was dead, did they? C’mon, Disney wouldn’t do that to a potential revenue source as clearly designed to be beloved and sell merchandise as that one. Having said all of that, the film succeeds more than it falters, and I wouldn’t mind spending more time with these characters in the inevitable sequel(s). Hopefully next time around they’ll give more attention to the female supporting players.

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The Boxtrolls

Posted : 1 week, 3 days ago on 16 April 2015 03:36 (A review of The Boxtrolls)

Of the five films nominated for Best Animated Feature at this year’s Oscar ceremony, The Boxtrolls is undoubtedly the weakest of the lot. Shame, as normally Laika produces my favorite nominee in the given year. No, I’m not quite over the failure of both Coraline and ParaNorman to win in their respective years.

The main problem with The Boxtrolls is that its disparate parts even weld together as well as Laika’s other feature films managed. There are elements of class struggles, racism, family structures and dynamics, and two villain sidekicks who continually have existential moments of doubt of whether what they are doing is good or bad. That’s a lot for any film to carry, and it doesn’t always carry it evenly towards its finish line.

Not to mention the strange diversion in which we learn that a main character is essentially a drag queen and loves it, with little explanation as to why they’re doing and what they hope to achieve with it. Or the lone major female character who is a concoction of entitled brat, snide, smart, and exceedingly bossy. She mostly hovers around shrill, but every so often, they’ll color her character with more depth by revealing a morbid streak as deep and wide as her privileged entitlement.

This isn’t Laika’s first dud by any means, but it is a strangely convoluted film. Doesn’t mean it isn’t without Laika’s typical attention to warm textures, colors, and highly detailed worlds. This one more asymmetrical, creating a colorful underground where the boxtrolls reside filled with mechanical gizmos and quirky sense of construction. It’s always a pleasure to sit back and absorb the beauty of their hand-crafted worlds and unique character designs. The Boxtrolls assigns each of the titular trolls with a separate identity by outfitting their boxes with a specific design, much like the seven dwarves were named after their dominant trait.

There’s plenty to admire and warmly greet in this film, and maybe my more muted reaction to the film is more emblematic of my out-sized expectations on a Laika product than the product itself. What’s here is fine quality, but it’s not a patch on their previous works.

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How to Train Your Dragon 2

Posted : 1 week, 3 days ago on 16 April 2015 03:36 (A review of How to Train Your Dragon 2)

I remember how gloriously shocked and awed I was at the original How to Train Your Dragon, here was an open-hearted film that boiled down to a troubled youth and his pet getting to know each other and have an adventure. It was mercifully free of the of-the-moment pop culture gags that were dated before the movie even premiered like Shark Tale, and not a single goofy montage was set to well-known pop song that felt distractingly wedged in like the later Shrek films.

How to Train Your Dragon was mild tempered and more concerned with world building than anything else that Dreamworks typically releases. It was a lovely change of pace, but it didn’t smooth my fears about a sequel once it was announced. Once more, Dreamworks track record with this sort of thing was not on their side.

How to Train Your Dragon 2 doesn’t quite match its exquisite predecessor, but it also doesn’t fail in the slightest bit. The third act may be a bit of a disappointment, but Dragon 2 is another entry in the series which prides itself on mostly quietly enjoying the scenery, introducing us to a variation of beautifully designed and strange creatures, and even more world building and expanding its mythology.

In the five years since the first film, this sequel has moved in real-time, picking its story five years down the line as well. Now an adult and due to inherit the rule of Berk, Hiccup is happier to spend his time flying around with Toothless exploring uncharted lands and creating a map of the outside world. Along the way, Hiccup reunites with his estranged, long believed dead, mother, and battle with the villain Drago.

The groundwork is laid for a spectacular feature, and while the animation is beyond gorgeous, the story has two major setbacks. First, Valka, Hiccup’s mother, is a wasted opportunity. A character given a mysterious and daring introduction, a huge build-up, and several highly emotional scenes before being removed from the major action and turned into a minor supporting player. It’s a bait-and-switch, a character that we think is going to be prominent turned into a wasted opportunity. Second, is Drago and his entire third-act which disrupts the quiet nature of the film with a big, loud action sequence. Drago is another character who is all build-up with little-to-no payoff. These choices harm a movie that is otherwise completely engaging and enjoyable. They don’t harm it beyond taking it from an A to a solid B but it had potential for more.

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Thelma & Louise

Posted : 1 week, 5 days ago on 14 April 2015 03:31 (A review of Thelma & Louise)

1991 was a great year for films with fully realized females in the lead roles, equally empowered and neurotic messes. They were recognizable as real people, maybe not people we knew in our real lives, but people that felt plausible, layered, and contradictory. Silence of the Lambs, Beauty and the Beast, The Prince of Tides, Fried Green Tomatoes, Ramblin’ Rose -- all of them feature deeply complicated, complete female characters in major roles. It felt like a possible turning point in which films proved that the entire industry didn’t need to cater to the male audience so consistently for big dollars.

Perhaps no film sent that shockwave as deeply as Thelma & Louise did, a pop-culture feminist manifesto in which two women rebel against society and revel in the deep bonds of sisterhood. It’s a heady mixture of road movie, buddy picture, and outlaws-on-the-run. Yet the script, direction, and lead performances find the balance between these three genres, weaving them together effortlessly, and popping out a pop masterpiece out of the other side.

The story concerns two best friends, the sweeter Thelma (Geena Davis) and the more world-weary Louise (Susan Sarandon), getting together for a weekend getaway. Of course, something goes horribly wrong to send them on their inevitable raging wake of pent-up feminine aggression. A would be rapist gets killed in self-defense, knowing that no one would believe their story, they go on the run.

Along the way they grow not only as people, gaining even more agency and rebellious spirit, but seem to speak against the very structure of society. These two women are mad as hell and aren’t going to take it anymore. Not only is the rapist taken down, but so is a trucker who makes unwanted sexual advances at them. They don’t kill him, but they destroy his truck. They rage against the paternal cop hot on their trail, a would-be savior that they dismantle at every turn with his unintended condescension towards them. These two don’t need anyone to save them, they’ll save themselves and each other.

That final scene is the existential battle cry. This is their decision, and they’ve decided that no one else is going to be making any decisions for them. It’s a bleak unhappy ending on one hand, but an ambiguous victory on the other. I can only imagine the deep catharsis that must have been felt by female movie-goers during the time this came out. As a feminist I encourage them to rage, to fight back, to discover themselves and make an uncompromising final choice with their lives. It’s one hell of a sucker-punch. Pity it didn’t start a wave of female-centric variations of genres until much, much later.

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Tetro

Posted : 1 week, 6 days ago on 13 April 2015 08:26 (A review of Tetro)

You’ve got to give major respect to Francis Ford Coppola for deciding to follow his muse this late in the game and continuing to make films like he’s fresh out of art-school. Do these films always work? No, but there’s a sense of adventure about his latest period of film-making that’s refreshing. These films are self-financed, so at least we’re confident in knowing that they’re exactly what he wants and meant for them to be.

And with Tetro, I think it’s safe to say that Coppola has made another solid feature film. No, it’s better than that. It might reach the heights of some of his masterpieces, but it’s pretty great.

Primarily filmed in black-and-white, color flourishes are reserved for fantasy sequences, Tetro marries Coppola’s two primary story-telling modes: big, operatic pieces and miniature character-focused pieces. Occasionally this marriage of the two styles gets away from him at the expense of the narrative, but he makes up for it with images that are consistently beautiful, bordering on ethereal at times, and heavily influenced by noir in others.

The story concerns the reunion of two long-estranged brothers in modern day Buenos Aires. This intimate bond, and the long-buried secrets that have kept them estranged, concerns much of the plot of the film. It unravels at a leisurely pace for the first hour or so, until the third act blows the entire roof off the joint in its operatic styling and revelations.

Coppola’s cast is game, and the three major players all deliver solid work. Alden Ehrenreich makes his debut here, and does solid work. Maribel Verdú stars as Tetro’s wife, and much like her work in Pan’s Labyrinth, she brings a soulful and supportive maternity along with a free-spirited nature. But it’s Vincent Gallo’s performance in the titular role that lingers the longest in the memory. His large eyes project a haunted and manic nature, and it’s his performance that ties together the earlier chamber pieces with the later excesses that threaten to overcook the material.

Despite being a little uneven in spots, Tetro holds out interests because it manages to invest us so deeply in the emotions and secrets of these three characters. The third-act reveal makes everything that has come before it shine in a different light, and things that once seemed oblique make perfect sense. It’s a strange, intoxicating blend of material, yet Coppola is clearly doing exactly what he wants to artistically. That kind of commitment is to be applauded, as is his penchant for still crafting small, independent art house fare while so many of his peers simply kick-back and cash in on grand, blockbuster entertainments.

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The Big Chill

Posted : 1 week, 6 days ago on 13 April 2015 06:40 (A review of The Big Chill)

Count me in as one of the detractors of this film. As one of the many who this as Exhibit A of what can, and does, make the Baby Boomer generation so goddamn insufferable whenever they go off on their “You had to be there, man” nostalgia riffs. The film views these characters with sympathy, but I couldn’t muster up much for them.

This group of people can’t seem to look beyond their navels. If they do, it’s only to then look towards the past with rose-tinted glasses, believing that the time that they came up was somehow the pinnacle of achievement. It frequently feels like self-indulgence of a bunch of wealthy white people unable to see their mass privilege. To be perfectly blunt about it, here’s a group of seven supremely glib people who treat the eighth, the audience surrogate, as a child when she’s really just a slightly younger member of their generation.

Shame to, as the ensemble on this thing is stacked with powerhouse acting titans. Jeff Goldblum, Glenn Close, William Hurt, Kevin Kline, Tom Berenger, JoBeth Williams, Meg Tilly, and Mary Kay Place give the script better life than it deserves. They deliver their series of unnecessarily clever one-liners with consummate skill. Try as they might though, they can’t overcome how easily the script leans on humor in place of real emotion and feeling.

If all of this nostalgia and introspection had been given more true emotional life, I probably wouldn’t have been so blasé on the whole enterprise. It scored to a phenomenal soundtrack, at times employed with cringe-inducing sequences, and stacked with a fabulous ensemble, so The Big Chill is never without its merits. It’s just so damn manipulative. Leaning on hard on these well-to-do white folks using the music of the Civil Rights era as their soundtrack for a weekend getaway is questionable if I’m being generous, and offensive if I’m being honest. And have I mentioned how much I dislike the pithy dialog? But that damn cast, though. The Big Chill is a movie that has me slightly split, cause where it’s good it soars, but where it’s bad, it’s smugly self-congratulatory.

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The Great Outdoors

Posted : 1 week, 6 days ago on 13 April 2015 06:40 (A review of The Great Outdoors)

A toothless comedy about culture clashes in 1980s America with a script by John Hughes. Not the worst way to spend 90 minutes, but not one of the better uses of its talented cast or beloved writer’s skills. The Great Outdoors plays more like the set-up of a sitcom stretched out to feature length, lots of bits works, and just as many land with a thud.

But, hey, we get to watch John Candy and Dan Aykroyd plays off of each other, and that’s worth something. Candy plays the poorer patriarch taking his family out into the woods for a nice quiet vacation, while Aykroyd is the yuppie brother-in-law bringing his family along to crash that vacation. The set-up is about all there is to the movie, with culture clashing over and over again and a few expected moments in which these city dwellers freak out about nature. It’s mildly amusing, but that’s about it.

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Bachelorette

Posted : 1 week, 6 days ago on 13 April 2015 06:40 (A review of Bachelorette)

Pity its third act twist into melodrama, because before that Bachelorette wasn’t a half-bad female-centric twist on a group of friends reuniting and behaving awfully for one wild night. Actually, Bachelorette never truly finds that sweet spot between moments of raunchy humor and emotional depth. It works better when it puts aside the quiet character moments and focuses instead on being a debauched riot.

Beginning with the revelation that their “fat friend” is getting married before any of them, the main trio reunite as said friend’s maid-of-honor and bridesmaids. Each of them seem to have calcified into their high school era personas – a type-A ice queen, a cynical and introspective drug addict, and a party-girl eternally looking for the next good time. And each of these characters are played beautifully, possibly because they’ve been cast to type by a group of strong actresses.

Kirsten Dunst finds a welcome balance between internally seething with rage at not reaching this milestone before the rest of her friends, and finding the laughs in the situation. Lizzy Caplan possibly plays her character with too much vulnerability and honesty, we root for her to get her head straightened out, yet find her equally frustrating over still being this wildly incompetent in maneuvering through life. Best in show is easily Isla Fisher as the manic, slapstick prone walking disaster zone.

Bachelorette utilizes them very well, but leaves talented comic actors like Rebel Wilson, Adam Scott, Hayes MacArthur, and James Marsden with very little to do. Andrew Rannells makes the most out of his minimal screen time, but wouldn’t this film have only improved with it had used this talented cast more effectively? I think so.

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Americano

Posted : 1 month ago on 23 March 2015 07:03 (A review of Americano)

Mathieu Demy’s presence is a heavy-burden to carry for any film, never mind one written, directed, and starring him. As the son of canonized icons of cinema Jacques Demy and Agnes Varda, Demy’s Americano feels like it needs to be something better than it is based purely on their long shadows, and it is merely adequate.

The bare bones of a strong story is there, but Demy isn’t much of an actor. His dispassionate performance starts life as a unique reading, we are about to see this man reawaken to himself and his life. This never materializes in Demy’s work, even when the script is clearly heading that way. He always looks slightly bored and disinterested in the material, strange to consider since it came from his mind.

Americano may mangle the central mystery’s payoff, which is very one-dimensional, yet it handles the confusion over whether something is remembered or colored by outside voices. Demy’s fractured memories of his youth in Los Angeles are seen through footage taken by his real-life mother Varda, and contrasted with his character’s frequent lapses in memory, or maybe they’ve been edited by his bitter father. This smoky recollection is the highlight of the film, and proves that Demy has a gift with screenwriting, but maybe he should reconsider acting and directing.

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Free Zone

Posted : 1 month ago on 23 March 2015 07:03 (A review of Free Zone)

A bit of a bait-and-switch from the beginning, which sees Natalie Portman crying in extreme close-up for 10 minutes straight. But Free Zone is unconcerned with Natalie Portman’s character, preferring instead to use her as an audience surrogate between two characters who function as symbols writ large for the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Free Zone lacks for subtlety and hammers home its various talking points repeatedly, stranding three talented actresses with little worthy material to work with.

The story is armed with loaded material – a Palestinian and an Israeli both look to an American to work as intermediary to square a debt – and the film overloads it with needlessly arty digressions. Loads of shots are superimposed over the car windows, colliding past and present, which would be more interesting and significant a choice if the film bothered with giving these women dialog worth listening to, or characters beyond their symbolic meaning. What we’re introduced to at the beginning of their journey is the same state they’re in when we reach the end. There’s some good film-making here, it’s just buried beneath strange choices and the questionable choice to present the eternal conflict in the Middle East as a quirky road trip.

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Daredevil
 Daredevil 8/10
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The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven

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A Single Man

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8/10

Love

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6 days, 17 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Big Hero 6

Big Hero 6

“Compared to the more ambitious, artistic, original, and daring works like Song of the Sea and The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, Big Hero 6 doesn’t hold a candle to them and makes for a bland Oscar winner. Taken on its own merits away from that Oscar win, Big Hero 6 is a perfectly charming, funny, w” read more

1 week, 3 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of The Boxtrolls

The Boxtrolls

“Of the five films nominated for Best Animated Feature at this year’s Oscar ceremony, The Boxtrolls is undoubtedly the weakest of the lot. Shame, as normally Laika produces my favorite nominee in the given year. No, I’m not quite over the failure of both Coraline and ParaNorman to win in their re” read more

1 week, 3 days ago

How to Train Your Dragon 2

“I remember how gloriously shocked and awed I was at the original How to Train Your Dragon, here was an open-hearted film that boiled down to a troubled youth and his pet getting to know each other and have an adventure. It was mercifully free of the of-the-moment pop culture gags that were dated bef” read more

1 week, 3 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Thelma & Louise

Thelma & Louise

“1991 was a great year for films with fully realized females in the lead roles, equally empowered and neurotic messes. They were recognizable as real people, maybe not people we knew in our real lives, but people that felt plausible, layered, and contradictory. Silence of the Lambs, Beauty and the Be” read more

1 week, 5 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Tetro

Tetro

“You’ve got to give major respect to Francis Ford Coppola for deciding to follow his muse this late in the game and continuing to make films like he’s fresh out of art-school. Do these films always work? No, but there’s a sense of adventure about his latest period of film-making that’s refres” read more

1 week, 6 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of The Big Chill

The Big Chill

“Count me in as one of the detractors of this film. As one of the many who this as Exhibit A of what can, and does, make the Baby Boomer generation so goddamn insufferable whenever they go off on their “You had to be there, man” nostalgia riffs. The film views these characters with sympathy, but ” read more

1 week, 6 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of The Great Outdoors

The Great Outdoors

“A toothless comedy about culture clashes in 1980s America with a script by John Hughes. Not the worst way to spend 90 minutes, but not one of the better uses of its talented cast or beloved writer’s skills. The Great Outdoors plays more like the set-up of a sitcom stretched out to feature length, ” read more

1 week, 6 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Bachelorette

Bachelorette

“Pity its third act twist into melodrama, because before that Bachelorette wasn’t a half-bad female-centric twist on a group of friends reuniting and behaving awfully for one wild night. Actually, Bachelorette never truly finds that sweet spot between moments of raunchy humor and emotional depth. ” read more

1 week, 6 days ago
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JxSxPx posted 2 images

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The Men
 The Men 7/10
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Young Justice

have watched

9/10

Batman: The Brave and the Bold

10/10


1 month ago
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Night Nurse

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Female

have watched

8/10

Three on a Match

9/10


1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Americano

Americano

“Mathieu Demy’s presence is a heavy-burden to carry for any film, never mind one written, directed, and starring him. As the son of canonized icons of cinema Jacques Demy and Agnes Varda, Demy’s Americano feels like it needs to be something better than it is based purely on their long shadows, an” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Free Zone

Free Zone

“A bit of a bait-and-switch from the beginning, which sees Natalie Portman crying in extreme close-up for 10 minutes straight. But Free Zone is unconcerned with Natalie Portman’s character, preferring instead to use her as an audience surrogate between two characters who function as symbols writ la” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
A Free Soul

have watched

6/10

TCM Archives - Forbidden Hollywood Collection, Vol. 2 (The Divorcee / A Free Soul / Night Nurse / Th

9/10


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Comments

Posted: 1 year, 6 months ago at Oct 26 17:23
Posted: 2 years ago at Apr 8 14:36
hi friend check out my new list .
hope you like it and thanks for your
time
http://www.listal.com/list/love-these-posters
Posted: 2 years ago at Mar 30 14:02
This might just sound schize, but thanks for re-writing my "Pocahontas" review-- saves me the trouble of figuring it all out *again* myself, a-hahahaha....
Posted: 2 years, 1 month ago at Mar 18 22:57
Thanks for participating in my lists.
Sorry, but you can't do another top, really sorry.
But thanks.
Posted: 2 years, 1 month ago at Mar 10 18:22
Thanks for taking part in my musicals list!

I also know how you feel, I found it hard to limit my choices down to 10.
Posted: 2 years, 3 months ago at Jan 19 23:47
hey friend check out my new list. hope you like it
http://www.listal.com/list/reflecting-beuty
Posted: 2 years, 4 months ago at Dec 21 16:14
Hello there! I enjoyed your review of Dracula and took myself the freedom to link it to my Universal Horror Films - Best to Worst list. Hope you're fine with that!
Posted: 2 years, 9 months ago at Jul 21 2:52
Thank u 4 your comment on the muses list. Suggestion added.
Posted: 3 years, 2 months ago at Jan 27 21:05
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members

(I may have asked you this already earlier, in this case, apology for the inconvenience!)
Posted: 3 years, 9 months ago at Jul 16 13:06
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members
Posted: 4 years, 5 months ago at Nov 18 1:19
O.O Thanks!!
Posted: 6 years, 3 months ago at Jan 12 20:17
cool reviews =]
Posted: 6 years, 5 months ago at Nov 15 17:51
Posted: 6 years, 8 months ago at Aug 12 18:48
Hey man, I see you're pretty new, I'm loving the reviews though! Great job.