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JxSxPx

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I'm Jason. I'm a film, literary and pop culture enthusiast. Got a soft spot and deep love for animation, comics and nerdy things that go in tandem with them.

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Recent reviews

All reviews - Movies (513) - TV Shows (48) - Books (3) - Music (118)

Saratoga

Posted : 2 weeks, 3 days ago on 15 August 2014 06:53 (A review of Saratoga)

Jean Harlow died mid-way through the production of Saratoga, and her absence can be strongly felt in the film. During the first half of the film, Saratoga provides Harlow with a snappy, banter filled screenplay to fire off flirtations and sarcastic comebacks with equal fervor at Clark Gable. We’ve already started off on the right foot here, but then the film goes wonky, no longer the tightly scripted and paced rapid-fire romance with a background in horse track drama, instead Saratoga is working hard to cover up Harlow’s disappearance from the plot.

Employing body doubles and voice actors to give a vague impression of her in a small handful of scenes, these newly written segments draw attention to themselves and away from the story. It’s clearly someone doing a Harlow impersonation with a large hat covering her face, or her back turned towards the camera so we can’t see her face. Plot strands that were expected to pay off with her character and now rushed to completion with someone else doing the exposition, or newly invented scenarios to try to steer the film from its logical story beats into the same destinations but on a new track. Of course, the death of your leading star mid-production will do that to a film, so one wonders why they didn’t just scrap it all together or recast the main role.

As it stands, Personal Property is a better swan song for Harlow’s talents and particular star persona. Saratoga’s decision to forge ahead and paper over their problems remains questionable to me. Would the film had been better if the decision to re-start production with Jean Arthur had gone ahead? I don’t know. Maybe it would have been a more cohesive product, no one can really say for sure. But if Harlow had lived to the end of it, based on what was there, Saratoga would have been a fine way to say goodbye to one of the original bombshells, and truly gifted comedienne.

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Personal Property

Posted : 2 weeks, 3 days ago on 15 August 2014 06:53 (A review of Personal Property)

Damn you, W.S. “Woody” Van Dyke! I mean, you’ve given the world The Thin Man, as perfect a romance/screwball comedy/noir as a movie can be, but your filmography is also littered with films hampered by your “one-and-done” philosophy of film-making.

Personal Property is the giddy, romantic, screwball comedy just yearning for a director like Preston Sturges, Howard Hawks, or Ernst Lubitsch to nurture and flower into full bloom. The completely ridiculous plot is the type we typically see in a screwball comedy: battle of the sexes, battle between the classes, mistaken identities, courting one person while falling in love with another. It’s a frothy entertainment, and could have been much better with a director more suited to this material.

But Personal Property is charming enough as it exists. Jean Harlow and Robert Taylor play off of each other nicely, and develop a pleasing chemistry. A scene in which they mime a picnic in their house is all small glances, bubbling attraction, and spritely verbal sparring. They’re given tremendous support from veteran character actors like E.E. Clive and the always welcome, slightly screechy Una O’Connor. Watching Harlow in this film, one would never guess that this was her final completed performance, and that she would die soon after. She seems so alive, like the fiery Pre-Code Harlow had finally found a proper vehicle for her charms and wits in this new era.

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Suzy

Posted : 2 weeks, 3 days ago on 15 August 2014 06:53 (A review of Suzy)

Funny thing about the Studio Era of Hollywood, they were the best at crafting films built entirely around a star’s persona, using each release to craft and hone that image and play with its various limitations and expansions. On the reverse of that, you also end with films that were crafted for one star, but ended up with an entirely different one in the lead. Suzy has a bit of an identity crisis.

It’s not a bad film; it’s just wildly unsettled and can’t decide which version of itself that it wants to be. Is it the sweeping romance with Harlow on one end, and two different men on the other? Or is it the WWI espionage war-time thriller, complete with spies and scenes of aerial combat? Both of them could work, but they don’t work together. The espionage material feels rushed and tacked on, the love triangle is a soggy mess.

Jean Harlow was clearly not the first choice for the title role, as the film frequently handicaps her madcap erotic energy into a dressed down, good girl role that she plays well, but it doesn’t highlight her strengths as an actress. Any number of actresses from the era could have played it, and done it just as well. It’s just another role in which Harlow’s innate gifts for screwball comedy, or cracking wise and posing tough are watered down to give her image a cleaner appeal. Personally, I miss the Pre-Code motor-mouth with the zany eroticism.

Cary Grant and Franchot Tone are the two men in her life, one a scoundrel who feels like a wrong fit for Grant’s more dream-lover charms, and the other a thought-dead nice guy. It’s refreshing to see Tone not give in to pouty, rich, daddy’s boy mannerisms that hampered his earlier roles, and he and Harlow still generate a pleasing romantic chemistry and play off of each other well. Allegedly, Grant’s role was originally intended for Clark Gable, and the rougher, alpha-male party boy feels like a perfect fit for Gable’s sensibilities. Grant’s never terrible, but he feels ill-suited for this role at this time.

Suzy is mostly notable for its dynamic dog-fight scenes, which were leftovers from Hell’s Angels, Harlow’s big break. These aerial sequences are fluid and adventurous in a way that much of the rest of the film is not. They stand in high contrast to the stately production of the rest of the film. As if every problem with it could be summarized in the back and forth between the kinetic views of planes in tailspin, then the quick cut to Harlow trying to keep a happy home and worrying about the men in her life.

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Donnie Brasco

Posted : 3 weeks ago on 11 August 2014 08:21 (A review of Donnie Brasco)

Donnie Brasco is an interesting bit of undercover cop drama, in that the undercover cop begins to feel empathy, friendship, and develop a strong bond with his new mentor in the mafia. The fun is in watching our undercover cop struggling valiantly with his allegiance, trying to decide to stick with his missions or help out his new friend.

While watching Donnie Brasco I was reminded of what a great actor Johnny Depp used to be, before he decided to hide behind increasingly deranged makeups and giving kooky readings instead of truly inhabiting and developing a character. I miss this Depp, who could pick strange projects or characters, but imbue them with an inner life. And it’s great to watch him slowly transition from interloper to inside man to conflicted friend. His brittle nerves and moral quagmire constantly written all over his face with each return visit home. Anne Heche does solid work as his fretting, worried wife who is sinking more often than she’s floating to keep everything together and remain strong.

Outside of the The Godfather trilogy, I’ve rarely, if ever, managed to warm-up to Al Pacino as an actor. I find him to frequently turn the dial up to eleven to start, and only get louder as he progresses with a characterization. Sometimes that scenery chewing tendency is a great antidote to a lackluster film (Dick Tracy), and other times it’s not (Scent of a Woman). Here Pacino starts at a lower-level and gradually builds to the larger one, and I quite enjoyed his performance. A scene where it’s open to debate whether or not he’s figured out that Depp is deceiving him at a houseboat is a marvel of nervous energy and suspicious behavior trying to be masked by a cracking exterior.

My only real complaint is that director Mike Newell frequently tries to steal from the GoodFellas playbook. It led me to wondering what Scorsese could have conjured up with this cast and this material. There are many times at which Newell’s choices in film-making feel less organic and his own, than a brief consideration of “What Would Scorsese Do?” This does not torpedo the film, but it does, at times, play an odd tone. Nevertheless, I greatly enjoyed Donnie Brasco for what is was – a well-made thriller in which we watch a man have a crisis of conscience.

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The Rainmaker

Posted : 3 weeks ago on 11 August 2014 08:21 (A review of The Rainmaker)

On the one hand, if you’ve seen one John Grisham film adaptation, you’ve pretty much seen them all. On the other hand, this one was done by Francis Ford Coppola and features a tony cast. Granted, this is director-for-hire Coppola. This is Coppola on the verge of bankruptcy and trying to scrounge up funds to save American Zoetrope. So don’t go into The Rainmaker expecting Coppola to transform this middling material into grand art like he did with The Godfather series. But it is well crafted, acted, directed; the only area that really lets it down is the familiar path that all Grisham stories tell.

The Rainmaker strains credibility frequently when we focus in on the major story line: small-time lawyer takes down big fatcat legal team representing a crooked insurance company. The film shines when its plot structure becomes less rigid and instead focuses in one the rich ensemble of supporting players. An oily judge kept in the pocket of rich attorneys (Dean Stockwell), an elderly woman who is a bit of the town matriarch (Teresa Wright), a chain-smoking former employee who’s ready to blow the whistle (Virginia Madsen), an abused woman and her tentative new romance with our hero (Claire Danes), her frightening husband (Andrew Shue, much like his sister more talented than people realized and also all but disappeared), and the main family members at the heart of the story (Mary Kay Place, Red West, Johnny Whitworth).

Spending time with these various characters is entertaining; watching the machinations of the plot force them into actions or plot turns is not. Matt Damon is solidly earnest, and just reminded of how good of an actor he is. I watched this for the first time shortly after watching Behind the Candelabra, and his range is apparent. Damon seems to excel in these kind of plucky, wide-eyed characters from hard-scrabble backgrounds who are thrust into sink-or-swim situations, and he can do much with that archetype.

Even as the film brushes with story twists and turns, all of which are glaringly obvious, it is smart enough to sit back and let Damon, Danny DeVito as his lawyer variation of unbridled id and stage-mother, Jon Voight practically leaving a slime trail as the head of the corporate attorney hydra, and Danny Glover as the newly appointed judge rip up the scenery in the big legal battle. No matter the material, Coppola always manages to get the best out of his actors. And this pulpy stuff is elevated to a higher material by their acting might alone.

I don’t know if this is the greatest of the Grisham adaptations, but with the pedigree of those involved of the making of it, I’d venture that it probably is. It’s never a great film, but it’s entertaining, briskly paced, and on a technical level very strong. It’s just a shame that Grisham’s story is obviously crafted to turn here, and there, and back again down the road instead of investing in a more artful narrative.

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Call Northside 777

Posted : 3 weeks ago on 11 August 2014 08:20 (A review of Call Northside 777)

Of the small number of Henry Hathaway films that I’ve seen, I haven’t cared much for any of his westerns, but I’m quite fond of his work in noir and thrillers. Niagara’s Technicolor vistas and Marilyn Monroe’s fantastic performance make that an enjoyable ride, while 14 Hours makes solid use of its ripped from the headlines story and ensemble of character actors. Call Northside 777 features many of those same strengths, like Niagara it’s got a great movie star turn in the central role, and like 14 Hours is takes a true story and embellishes it to great dramatic effect, sprinkling in some character actors giving solid work in meaty parts.

A reporter (James Stewart) is sent to investigate a classified ad seeking information about a decade old murder. The ad was placed by a wrongly convicted killer’s hopeful mother. Stewart’s initially sceptic about the prospects of the story, and the man’s innocence, but is encourage by his boss to keep digging deeper. The fact that the film will eventually prove this suspicion correct is no surprise, it practically telegraphs this detail from the very beginning.

What makes Call Northside 777 so special is how it deep dives into the mundane details of reporting. Much of the twists and turns rely upon Stewart’s discovery of evidence that is missing, or stories that don’t align correctly, the absence of information while providing lots of extraneous pieces. Much of the film relies less on sensational reveals than on gaining new bits of knowledge to create a new perspective on the events that have unfolded.

And Stewart plays it all beautifully. After returning to films from WWII service, Stewart had a rough few years trying to regain his footing. That doesn’t mean his performances were slouches, just that his box office strength wasn’t as impressive as it had been. I’ve always found his post-WWII work to be filled with superior choices of roles, collaborators, and stronger work. Call Northside 777 may not be one of his towering career heights, but it’s one of those surprising smaller movies that gets stuck in the valley between It’s a Wonderful Life and Harvey. And the two major supporting players, Lee J. Cobb and Richard Conte, may even surpass his work. Cobb essays the role of Stewart’s editor at the paper, a warm presence who keeps pushing for the story to go further in. And Conte is the framed man, all desperate and pleading for someone to help him prove that he was railroaded into his current state.

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Bad Lieutenant

Posted : 3 weeks ago on 11 August 2014 08:20 (A review of Bad Lieutenant)

Bad Lieutenant is like Mean Streets gone to rot, with the same manic energy fueled by rock ’n’ roll and narcotics, another story of New York City, Catholic guilt, and starring Harvey Keitel. Between the two, I think Scorsese’s opus of morally confused hoods is greater, but that doesn’t mean Bad Lieutenant is a slouch or fails to carry its own merits. It’s more like the sense of “more is more” can hit overload and fail to be shocking, winding up being dull in spots.

After a few moments in this man’s company, it’s very clear that he’s plunging through the numerous circles of hell with boulders tied to both ankles. By the time we’ve seen him ingest a copious amount of drugs, mess around with several hookers, and then sexually assaulting a teenager on the job, which may have been the moment I went “OK, I get it, he’s bad,” we know that there’s no real room for redemption in this life. Maybe in the next one, as Bad Lieutenant is equally mired in Catholicism as it is in relishing its exploitation bonafides.

After a while, watching the film gleefully view various despicable acts while butting heads with deeply religious imagery, it begins to dull its own impact. It’s envelope pushing just for the sake of it in spots, which is boring if there’s no deeper reasoning behind it. Yet Keitel’s committed and deeply felt performance works hard to effectively smooth over these various transitions, he always tries to find the heart and soul of this man in freefall, even if the film isn’t entirely sure or even bothered with the actual presence of those things. It does become harder to care about someone who is written as being anti-human, yet Keitel manages to make us invest our time and empathy with this man.

The fact that the film wants to play for redemption, but on its own black-hearted terms is admirable. There’s clearly no way for this guy to be redeemed, and he consistently seems on the edge of dying. How he goes could have ended up in several different ways – overdose, random act of violence, suicide, target of a hit. It doesn’t matter which, his life is too bleak for any light to shine through. And while I may have had some problems with many stylistic choices that the films made, one cannot argue with the fact that it played by the rules of its world from the first frame to the last. It’s a complete vision, not a pretty one, but a complete one.

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Hoffa

Posted : 3 weeks ago on 11 August 2014 08:20 (A review of Hoffa)

A film about Jimmy Hoffa already has a leg-up on other films because its subject is so damn interesting. It’s a pity that Hoffa doesn’t bother with examining the man, instead preferring to stare up at him in awe, viewed through the eyes of someone else, with no insight or depth brought to the main character.

Yet this lack of insight into Hoffa’s reasoning or feelings behind his actions doesn’t come close to being the main problem with this film. The biggest problem with Hoffa is that it is quite simply imminently forgettable. For all of its lavish period details and ambitions of epic scope and scale, Hoffa does not bother with critical thinking about its subject matter, never mines much depth of the rich dramatic ground it covers. And it places Hoffa in a secondary role to Danny DeVito’s best friend, who just so happens to be present at every important event.

One cannot fault DeVito’s eye as a director, for much of the film looks handsome, but one does wish that he had taken a point-of-view about this material and gone with that. Luckily, he has Nicholson in the titular role, trying valiantly to spin straw into gold. Normally the marriage of Nicholson and David Mamet would excite me, but between this and The Postman Always Rings Twice, I’m left wondering why they seem to cancel each other out. Mamet’s script needed a more clear vision, why is he telling the story of this man? What insights can he bring us about his journey? Hoffa, like many biopics before and since, is too scattershot, too eager to hit the big events of this person’s life, preferring to take a controversial figure and change their lives into a greatest hits package, and nothing more.

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Party Monster

Posted : 1 month ago on 3 August 2014 02:07 (A review of Party Monster)

Camp can be wildly entertaining when utilized effectively, but Party Monster turns camp affectation into lurid displays of violence and becomes a case of too much growing tedious. It’s all crazy pageantry of costumes, trying to establish a style and relish in it, and offering not much of substance to chew on about a real-life case that was fascinating, and a scene that was even more interesting. Party Monster manages to make the Club Kids look ugly and bothersome more than anything else.

Thankfully, Party Monster has a strong lead performance in Seth Green as James St. James, portraying him as a self-deluded, grandiose variation of Oscar Wilde, only pumped full of designer drugs and ornate costuming. He manages to find and continuously strike the delicate balance between camp and pathos that none of the other actors can manage. I would call it a star making performance, but Green had been consistently working in television and films since he was a child.

Macaulay Culkin was trying to make a comeback and move away from his child star image around this time, so a role like Michael Alig and a project like Party Monster seemed like a great idea to complete both of these tasks. While Culkin was incredibly attractive around this time, he was also less confident in the actual performance. He never finds his footing, only skimming the surface and preferring to strike poses and deliver his lines in a put upon cadence than developing a real character. The contrast between Culkin’s work and Green’s is night and day. One of them is giving a thought-out development of the character and the other is merely playing dress-up.

But maybe the greatest sin of the film isn’t just its over indulgence in theatrics with no real payoff, but that it makes everything look ugly. Even before the preordained fall of these stories, the Club Kids and their nirvana of strange parties and dancefloors never seemed particularly inviting or exciting. It just looks muted and garish. And the film never gives us a clearer point-of-view besides trying out a faux-documentary approach from time-to-time. Highlighting some of the absurdity of the case would have been better, or going from day-glo Wonderland to a garish paradise lost would have been more effective. Anything other than hammering home the fact that too much of something is bad for you and needlessly tedious.

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The Deep End

Posted : 1 month ago on 3 August 2014 02:07 (A review of The Deep End)

A modern noir in which a mother must protect her teenage son from a blackmailer who has a videotape in which he can be seen having sex with a much older man, an older man who has just been found dead and had questionable taste in friends. The Deep End is a solid noir with a twisting plot and solid lead actress in the great Tilda Swinton, and strong supporting roles for Jonathan Tucker, Josh Lucas, and Goran Visnjic. Though it must be said, The Deep End is mostly an excuse to indulge in the noir trope of watching a brittle woman slowly break over time.

The film never finds that extra spark that allows it go from very commendable, strongly made work to superlative, but it’s smart to play all of its major chips on Swinton’s shoulders. She makes every tiny shift from composed to frantic to a nervous breakdown and back with ease and skill that makes it look as if she isn’t even acting at all. While the story hits every plot turn you would expect, Swinton makes it feel real and lived in, her very presence keeps the ante high and clearly visible.

Yet the film crumbles when the main heavy is revealed. Josh Lucas’s brief time as the older man who very existence and dangerous sexual charisma appear to threaten mother and son lingers in the mind despite his short screen time. So Raymond Barry had a big task in crafting a man who seemed like a credible enough threat to blow Lucas from the memory and go toe-to-toe with Swinton, and he doesn’t live up to the task at hand. Visnjic begins as his second-in-command before slowly switching sides and crumbling to the moral complexity of his actions. Visnjic needed to appear mysterious and then change to supportive, and he does a fine job with this. Barry needed to appear calm, in control, and quietly threatening, but The Deep End stumbles here. It’s the major crime keeping the film from making that extra leap from very good to great.

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The Movies Begin - A Treasury of Early Cinema, 1894-1913

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1 week, 3 days ago
2 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Saratoga

Saratoga

“Jean Harlow died mid-way through the production of Saratoga, and her absence can be strongly felt in the film. During the first half of the film, Saratoga provides Harlow with a snappy, banter filled screenplay to fire off flirtations and sarcastic comebacks with equal fervor at Clark Gable. We’ve” read more

2 weeks, 3 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Personal Property

Personal Property

“Damn you, W.S. “Woody” Van Dyke! I mean, you’ve given the world The Thin Man, as perfect a romance/screwball comedy/noir as a movie can be, but your filmography is also littered with films hampered by your “one-and-done” philosophy of film-making.

Personal Property is the giddy, ” read more

2 weeks, 3 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Suzy

Suzy

“Funny thing about the Studio Era of Hollywood, they were the best at crafting films built entirely around a star’s persona, using each release to craft and hone that image and play with its various limitations and expansions. On the reverse of that, you also end with films that were crafted for on” read more

2 weeks, 3 days ago
Downfall
 Downfall 9/10
2 weeks, 3 days ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
Agora

have watched

5/10

Guardians of the Galaxy

8/10


2 weeks, 5 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Donnie Brasco

Donnie Brasco

“Donnie Brasco is an interesting bit of undercover cop drama, in that the undercover cop begins to feel empathy, friendship, and develop a strong bond with his new mentor in the mafia. The fun is in watching our undercover cop struggling valiantly with his allegiance, trying to decide to stick with h” read more

3 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of The Rainmaker

The Rainmaker

“On the one hand, if you’ve seen one John Grisham film adaptation, you’ve pretty much seen them all. On the other hand, this one was done by Francis Ford Coppola and features a tony cast. Granted, this is director-for-hire Coppola. This is Coppola on the verge of bankruptcy and trying to scrounge” read more

3 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Call Northside 777

Call Northside 777

“Of the small number of Henry Hathaway films that I’ve seen, I haven’t cared much for any of his westerns, but I’m quite fond of his work in noir and thrillers. Niagara’s Technicolor vistas and Marilyn Monroe’s fantastic performance make that an enjoyable ride, while 14 Hours makes solid us” read more

3 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Bad Lieutenant

Bad Lieutenant

“Bad Lieutenant is like Mean Streets gone to rot, with the same manic energy fueled by rock ’n’ roll and narcotics, another story of New York City, Catholic guilt, and starring Harvey Keitel. Between the two, I think Scorsese’s opus of morally confused hoods is greater, but that doesn’t mean ” read more

3 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Hoffa

Hoffa

“A film about Jimmy Hoffa already has a leg-up on other films because its subject is so damn interesting. It’s a pity that Hoffa doesn’t bother with examining the man, instead preferring to stare up at him in awe, viewed through the eyes of someone else, with no insight or depth brought to the ma” read more

3 weeks ago
3 weeks, 1 day ago
JxSxPx posted 4 images

3 weeks, 3 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Party Monster

Party Monster

“Camp can be wildly entertaining when utilized effectively, but Party Monster turns camp affectation into lurid displays of violence and becomes a case of too much growing tedious. It’s all crazy pageantry of costumes, trying to establish a style and relish in it, and offering not much of substance” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of The Deep End

The Deep End

“A modern noir in which a mother must protect her teenage son from a blackmailer who has a videotape in which he can be seen having sex with a much older man, an older man who has just been found dead and had questionable taste in friends. The Deep End is a solid noir with a twisting plot and solid l” read more

1 month ago

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Comments

Posted: 10 months, 1 week ago at Oct 26 17:23
Posted: 1 year, 4 months ago at Apr 8 14:36
hi friend check out my new list .
hope you like it and thanks for your
time
http://www.listal.com/list/love-these-posters
Posted: 1 year, 5 months ago at Mar 30 14:02
This might just sound schize, but thanks for re-writing my "Pocahontas" review-- saves me the trouble of figuring it all out *again* myself, a-hahahaha....
Posted: 1 year, 5 months ago at Mar 18 22:57
Thanks for participating in my lists.
Sorry, but you can't do another top, really sorry.
But thanks.
Posted: 1 year, 5 months ago at Mar 10 18:22
Thanks for taking part in my musicals list!

I also know how you feel, I found it hard to limit my choices down to 10.
Posted: 1 year, 7 months ago at Jan 19 23:47
hey friend check out my new list. hope you like it
http://www.listal.com/list/reflecting-beuty
Posted: 1 year, 8 months ago at Dec 21 16:14
Hello there! I enjoyed your review of Dracula and took myself the freedom to link it to my Universal Horror Films - Best to Worst list. Hope you're fine with that!
Posted: 2 years, 1 month ago at Jul 21 2:52
Thank u 4 your comment on the muses list. Suggestion added.
Posted: 2 years, 7 months ago at Jan 27 21:05
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members

(I may have asked you this already earlier, in this case, apology for the inconvenience!)
Posted: 3 years, 1 month ago at Jul 16 13:06
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members
Posted: 3 years, 9 months ago at Nov 18 1:19
O.O Thanks!!
Posted: 5 years, 7 months ago at Jan 12 20:17
cool reviews =]
Posted: 5 years, 9 months ago at Nov 15 17:51
Posted: 6 years ago at Aug 12 18:48
Hey man, I see you're pretty new, I'm loving the reviews though! Great job.