JxSxPx is using Listal to create lists, share images get recommendations and much more
Avatar
Points: 176966    17 Followers

JxSxPx

About me

I'm Jason. I'm a film, literary and pop culture enthusiast. Got a soft spot and deep love for animation, comics and nerdy things that go in tandem with them.

Lists

3 votes
Favorite movies (249 items)
Movie list by JxSxPx
Last updated 1 month, 2 weeks ago
1 votes
Favorite TV Shows (38 items)
Tv list by JxSxPx
Published 6 years, 1 month ago
Favorite Actors & Actresses (100 items)
Person list by JxSxPx
Last updated 2 months, 1 week ago
1 votes
Favorite Music Artists (100 items)
Person list by JxSxPx
Last updated 2 months, 2 weeks ago
2 votes
Favorite Directors (45 items)
Person list by JxSxPx
Last updated 2 months, 2 weeks ago



Recent reviews

All reviews - Movies (537) - TV Shows (54) - Books (3) - Music (118)

The Road

Posted : 6 hours, 10 minutes ago on 26 November 2014 02:19 (A review of The Road)

Cormac McCarthy’s The Road is a devastating look at life after the destruction and collapse of organized civilization, and a moving look at the lengths one father will go towards keeping his son safe. Told with the simplicity and power of Biblical language, the novel is alternately profoundly moving and emotionally gutting, violent yet hopeful. The film version is well-made, well acted, and looks like what one would imagine as you read the text, yet it’s missing that brutal poetry of McCarthy’s language.

The film version of The Road is case of an adaptation doing everything right, but still missing that extra spark to make it really ignite. McCarthy’s prose is deceptively simple, a muscular beast that brings to mind both the language of the church and Faulkner’s Southern Gothic cadences. No film can truly capture it, and The Road thrives upon it. But this version of the story adequate itself as best it can.

Director John Hillcoat moves the material along efficiently, making a few omissions of scenes of great depravity or disturbing findings. He creates a world in which life is quickly swirling the drain, and the roving bands of cannibals hidden amongst the ash and dwindling supplies loom largely as a new kind of all too real boogeyman. And he casts the two lead roles perfectly, Viggo Mortensen is stubborn survivalism and dogged determination to survive and protect his son. While Kodi Smit-McPhee plays the son, a character that is both strangely naïve and innocent yet highly aware that death lurks around every corner and could overtake them at any moment.

Charlize Theron, Robert Duvall, and Guy Pearce appear in small supporting parts. The primary focus of The Road is on the father and son journeying towards the sea, no reason is given other than we’ve been taught that we’re supposed to go to the ocean, driving their by pioneering spirit and vague concepts like Manifest Destiny. Theron is the wife and mother of these characters, a woman who could no longer live in this world and chose to walk towards her fate one night, leaving them both behind. Duvall appears briefly in one extended scene as a blind elderly man they encounter, and Guy Pearce as a family man at the climax. These roles amount to little more than extended cameos, and occasionally feel like distractions. Why not just get unknown actors for such small parts, or were they needed to help finance the film?

I admit it, there’s a cardinal sin in reviewing a movie based on a book in how well it captures the book. An adaptation must take the essence and main points of the novel, remodel them to work in a new media, and have an artistic point-of-view. Demanding that a film be married to the text is a fools journey, and perhaps some of my reservations about The Road as a film are in direct contrast with my love for McCarthy’s writing. The film is great, but the novel has power that is more emotional. Could there have been a way for the film-makers to capture that power in the film? Perhaps, but perhaps McCarthy’s prose style is too acutely suited for the page and not the screen to correctly translate.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Traffic

Posted : 6 hours, 10 minutes ago on 26 November 2014 02:19 (A review of Traffic)

Traffic takes a look at the War on Drugs through a prismatic lens – focusing equally at their source, the public, federal government, and the U.S. border. Some stories are more interesting than others are, and the entire film is awash in needlessly artsy cinematography. Each story has its own distinct look and color scheme, frequently washed or bleached out and layered over with a colored filter.

Thankfully, Traffic presents these various stories with an even hand and refrains from the typically Hollywood choice of blustery editorializing. Addiction is a health issue – physical, emotional, mental – and shouldn’t be treated like a crime. I’ve long believed this given my own history and complicated personal relationships, and it’s nice to see a film which treats the issue as such. At least, as far as the story about a U.S. politician’s daughter descent into crack-cocaine addiction and self-destruction goes. That’s one is good, even better is the pregnant housewife of luxury that sees her entire world turn upside down once it’s revealed that her husband is a high-level drug dealer. She turn from sheltered housewife to avenging queen of a cartel is a shocking display of fight-or-flight through a warped filter.

Traffic is built upon multiple stories that frequently don’t connect directly but connect spiritually. Some are more engaging than others, but all of them are filled with a brilliant ensemble of great actors doing commendable work. Benicio del Toro gets a flashy role as a Mexican cop playing several sides, and he gives it his gonzo all. He won all the applause and awards at the time, but the role that the film rests upon is Michael Douglas’ conflicted U.S. politician. He must travel smoothly from righteous indignation about the entire abstract concept and realities of drug use in America to a more understanding and grey area as it arrives upon his doorstep.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Easy Rider

Posted : 6 hours, 10 minutes ago on 26 November 2014 02:19 (A review of Easy Rider)

I don’t mean this in a snide or mean-spirited way, in fact this isn’t a criticism at all, but Easy Rider is like an encapsulation of the late 60s counter-cultural movement played out in microcosm. A pure distillation of the concerns, thoughts, and bacchanal of that generation’s ennui played out across the road. What exactly are Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper looking for in Easy Rider? Who knows for certain, but what they find is a portrait of an American filled with rot and sickness.

Tangentially, Fonda and Hopper are trafficking drugs from Los Angeles to New Orleans, but the film takes many detours away from this main plot, dabbling in existentialism and an encroaching dread. It came out around the time of Woodstock, but something about Easy Rider’s minimalist dialog, wandering eye for scenery, and heavy use of destructive symbolize to telegraph the ending play like a warm-up for the destruction of the very movement it’s capturing.

I’m not entirely sure if Easy Rider plays today as living cinema the way a film like Bonnie & Clyde still does, or if it plays out as a moving historical diagram of the period. No matter, few films feel as authentically lived in and observed. Hopper and Fonda are rightly considered iconographic figureheads of the era and culture this film dictates, and that was before Easy Rider cemented them into the public consciousness as such. Once you add in New Hollywood mainstays like Karen Black and Jack Nicholson in some of their first major roles, then Easy Rider deserves its classic status tenfold.

Granted, not every segment in Rider is an absolute winner. An extended stay at a hippie commune is alternately banal and a strange sidetrack. Much better is when Jack Nicholson’s alcoholic lawyer appears, and everything congeals into a satisfying and coherent whole. He gives them the information about a brothel in New Orleans, which will come into play later as an acid trip with two hookers in a cemetery turns sour. We’ve been spiraling towards an unhappy ending throughout, and this sequence only solidifies that dark creeping feeling. Looking at it now, it’s as if Hopper and Fonda stared into their generations dreams, the American ideal that their parents fed them, and found only a destructive energy, an unstable force barely holding together several institutions that were ready to crumble at a moment’s notice. “We blew it, man.” What he meant then and how it plays now are two vastly different things.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Safety Not Guaranteed

Posted : 1 day, 6 hours ago on 25 November 2014 01:49 (A review of Safety Not Guaranteed)

Safety Not Guaranteed is one of those blandly smug indie films that suddenly turn cloyingly earnest in the end, wanting to play it both ways. Granted, I found some of the tone and treatment of Mark Duplass’s character to be generally questionable throughout, turning him from a deeply emotionally damaged man to just a quirky eccentric by the end being the main offender. But damn if I didn’t stick it out for Aubrey Plaza’s pleasingly acerbic and tender lead performance.

Perhaps my biggest problem with Safety Not Guaranteed is that ending, which tosses out the main thrust of the film up to that point: “You can’t go back.” As the film neared its conclusion I began to have a sinking feeling in my stomach that they were going to abandon everything they had built up to that point and make the time travel actually work. They did, and I think the film’s easy out of a happy ending was a betrayal of the emotionally grounded narrative up to that point. But is it really a happy ending? There’s a brighter future standing in front of them, but they can’t see past their specific hurts to acknowledge that.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Capote

Posted : 1 day, 7 hours ago on 25 November 2014 01:15 (A review of Capote)

There are many ways to tackle a celebrity biographical film, typically they lean hard on the “greatest hits” approach, presenting a series of vignettes that don’t add up to a complete portrait or point-of-view as to why this artist mattered. Instead these films gloss over everything that went into crafting their public image or artistry, presenting a canonized portrait of the persona, one in which they seemed to spring fully formed from the ephemera of the culture of their time in order to move things forward. These films are tedious, and the examples of them too numerous to mention, far better are the films which zero in on one specific moment and use it to explore why this person mattered.

Capote focuses in on the titular author’s decision to take a grisly murder story he read in the newspaper, and write a book about, crafting an entirely new genre of writing in the process, while simultaneously destroying his creative muse in the process. In a sense, Capote sees both the birth of a legendary work and the moment that lead to the decades long demise of his artistic output, becoming a jet set member and frequent bon vivant on talk show appearances. The seeds of the latter are sprinkled throughout the film, while the former is the driving force of the film.

Truman Capote’s life is made up of such moments that could be made into arresting and engaging films, but it makes sense to focus in on the creation of In Cold Blood. A manageable four year period of time, which saw him go from an author of respected short stories and novels to a literary lion and white-hot celebrity, birthing the non-fiction book in the process, and the film uses this entry point to explore the complicated psychosis of the troubled writer.

Seeing a news item and a chance to create a portrait of a town dealing with tragedy, Capote’s ambitions get the better of him, driving him inextricably towards Holcomb, Kansas. For Capote, this town would grow to become the location of his eventually undoing, as he grows closer and closer to the two murders, one of whom in particular could be described as something of a (twisted) soul mate or kindred spirit. The contradiction of falling in love with one of the killers while needing them to die to create a satisfying conclusion to his book highlights the viciousness of Capote’s ambitions while also planting the seeds of alcoholic destruction and complete avoidance of his artistic craft. The film slowly shows us the broken, destructive core, a man of great narcissism, underneath the mask of a charming, impish wit and social butterfly.

The (late) great Philip Seymour Hoffman’s essay of Capote is not an easy bit of copying mannerisms and resting on obvious twitches of a public persona. Hoffman digs deeper than normal, revealing the self-hatred in quiet moments when Capote realizes he has fallen in love with the killer while also waiting for him to die. A telling exchange occurs between him and his best friend, Harper Lee (a magnificently understated and warm Catherine Keener), where he says that there was nothing he could do to save them, and she responds with “Maybe, but the fact is that you didn’t want to.” Lee is the only character in the film who sees Capote for who he truly is, and she telegraphs it often.

Scenes of Capote gad flying about town with the rich and famous, poking fun at the rubes he’s documenting, then returning to Kansas and charming them with stories of the glitterati and movie stars display his contradictions. If one knows anything about his life, one knows that Capote’s childhood was marked by loneliness and abandonment, his public face a carefully cultivated persona to get love and attention from whoever was present. These scenes reveal that neediness and sadness. While not always a flattering portrait, Capote is fair-handed in detailing both the good and bad of a real person. What makes the film work so well, and Hoffman’s performance so perfect, is how it stares Capote’s moral and artistic disintegration straight in the eye and never flinch for a moment.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Bugsy

Posted : 1 day, 7 hours ago on 25 November 2014 01:14 (A review of Bugsy)

A tiny bit of a mess, Bugsy wants to be both a quiet character study, a loud mafia epic, and a portrait of a doomed love affair, while winding up being mostly a damn fine entertainment. Much of that credit goes to leading man Warren Beatty, a notoriously picky star who hasn’t made as many films as his reputation of Hollywood royalty would suggest. Beatty wouldn’t have to put much effort into making us want to watch him, but his work in Bugsy is completely committed.

This goes a great deal to making Bugsy work, because as written his character is very one-dimensional. The film leans heaviest on a plot for Bugsy to turn the Nevada desert into a wonderland of casinos and a Mecca for gangland behavior. No attention is paid to his back story, so he arrives and remains a bit of a narrowly envisioned enigma. Beatty’s megawatt charisma and background as an untamable bad boy add layers that wouldn’t be there otherwise. Is it a performance because Beatty makes it so flashy, or is it a flashy performance and so great because of sheer movie star strength? It’s probably a bit of both.

Bugsy does have the unfortunate feeling of droning on for a bit too long, and while Beatty and Annette Bening could start forest fires with the way their romantically stare at each other, the story never evolves in a satisfying way. Call me crazy, but I think Bugsy would have been much better if it had focused in on any one of these various plot strands and made it the main focus of the film. As much as I enjoy watching these two romance and betray each other, it repeats itself too much and becomes dull towards the end. If anything, Bugsy could have been a gangster epic on par with any of Scorsese’s 90s great films, but it ends up feeling like an entertainment from another era. One in which its epic length is not matched by a wealth of thematic material and high quality.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Vincent & Theo

Posted : 1 day, 7 hours ago on 25 November 2014 01:14 (A review of Vincent & Theo)

Vincent & Theo was originally a miniseries for European television, and the film product suffers from being truncated. One gets the sense that many of the twists, turns, and slowly building character development and biographical details would be better served in their original format. Not that the film is bad, with Robert Altman at the helm even if the film doesn’t work as a whole, it’s still has plenty of interesting parts to keep you interested.

Vincent & Theo mostly works for me. The story of Vincent Van Gogh is rich with details and fascinating events that make most fiction about struggling artists seem cutesy in comparison. And the complicated relationship Vincent had with his brother Theo, a more repressed gallery owner. This being Altman, clichéd choices are left in the dust in favor of a more organic approach. Van Gogh’s struggling artist is at times prickly, bordering on likeable, and slowly descending into madness as his genius goes unnoticed in his lifetime.

Altman has two terrific lead actors at his disposal, Tim Roth as Vincent and Paul Rhys as Theo. Roth makes his Van Gogh an insular personality, true details like his penchant for eating paint or having seizures become organic outgrowths of an atypical personality, and his descent into madness and suicidal tendencies the logical outcome. Rhys has the trickier role of Theo, who is outwardly neurotic and capable of performing in society unlike his brother. Rhys also works with Roth to make the brothers share something like a telepathic bond, which goes a long way towards explaining how Van Gogh was able to alienate everyone else in his life but not his brother. Roth gets the obviously flashier role, but Rhys is the movie’s real MVP, providing a capable support system, and it becomes more shocking that Theo begins to crack up as time goes on.

There are many thematic instances of Altman appearing to make grand statements about art versus commerce or unappreciated genius. But these feel too easy of targets for such a singular, cynical vision as Altman’s. As I said earlier, these themes feel partially formed, and if I could view the complete miniseries in its original form, I wonder if they would be more subverted. Or possibly even fully explored and dug up to find newer talking points in these ideas. As it exists, Vincent & Theo is a solidly made portrait of a struggling artist. And I’m sure it would make for an exciting and strange double-feature with Minnelli’s equally intense, if more obvious but more satisfying, Lust for Life.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Behind the Candelabra

Posted : 4 weeks ago on 28 October 2014 07:35 (A review of Behind the Candelabra)

Steven Soderbergh’s work offers the biggest charge when he sits back and watches as professional commitments and messy private lives loudly crash into each other. Some of the best moments in Traffic are when Catherine Zeta-Jones’ pampered wife goes from bored housewife to cutthroat queen of the cartel or Michael Douglas’ Congressman having to rescue his drug addled daughter while confronting the messy realities of his war on drugs. And Behind the Candelabra is obsessed with the complex ways in which public persona of a talented artist causes him to be something of a controlling tyrant in his personal life.

A long-gestating passion project for Soderbergh, Behind the Candelabra is a fitting swansong for the auteur. Not only does it reunite him with Douglas, who gave a great performance in the above-mentioned Traffic and is even better here, but it practically rooted itself in his personal obsessions. It follows the five years in which a man named Scott Thorson (Matt Damon) becomes Liberace’s paid lackee, live-in boyfriend, and eventually spurned lover.

Their twisted romance, from a brilliant script by Richard LaGravanese, is a jaundiced prism through which we view showbiz and its desperation for submission and uniformity. Liberace demands a total acquiescence to his whims and ideals. He is a man who only wants those to who throw themselves at his feet in worship near him, and any slight questioning of his dictatorship is to find yourself cut out from his life. Replaced with a newer, younger, more eager model to bend and contort to his pleasures, or for them. Yet we glimpse inside of these moments the fragile, broken man demanding acceptance from a larger society, a safe haven in which he can completely himself.

If the original plan had gone through to release this a big screen entertainment instead of an HBO movie, I have no doubt in my mind that Michael Douglas would have found himself the proud owner of Oscar number three (he won previously as producer of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and actor for Wall Street). His clean sweep on the television awards circuit was well deserved. His performance is a marvel of not only capturing the cadence and mannerisms of the subject matter, but crafting a complete portrait of a real person. His narcissism is acidic to any healthy relationship, but there’s still a sympathetic individual and gaudy, entertaining persona wrapped around that damaged core. It’s one hell of a performance, and the better for not resting on easy imitation and avoiding loud, obvious choices.

Matt Damon is no slouch in the film either, having to sell us a naïve youth swept up in the tacky glamour of Las Vegas and the corrosive entrapments of fame and wealth. His Scott is eager to love and appease Liberace, but writing it off as a youth looking for a daddy figure is too simple. By the time Scott’s given himself over to the point of plastic surgery to look more like his lover/sugar daddy/benefactor, we have entered into a warped reality in which normal decisions about healthy relationships, morals, and strength of character no longer apply.

Orbiting them is a strange batch of character actors, and each of them is wonderful in their parts. Debbie Reynolds began life as a megawatt Movie Star, and has now found herself as a consummate character actress. It took me a moment to realize that was her as Liberace’s mother, she’s slathered in makeup prosthetics and a strange accent. She has one scene in which she’s playing a slot machine over and over, eventually hitting a jackpot, and proceeds to belittle and embarrass her son for not being able to pay her the full amount of her winnings. This small fragment is a tiny piece of character building for both of them, giving us a glimpse into where exactly he learned that relationships and profits can be intertwined.

Even better are Dan Aykroyd playing it straight as Liberace’s manager, Scott Bakula as a long-time friend who brings him fresh young boys to seduce and dominate, and Rob Lowe as a plastic surgeon. Lowe’s pinched face is a disturbing vision of the lengths one will go to preserve their image, and Lowe plays him as an impossibly attractive devil here to offer solace in the form of habit-forming pills and the tools to eradicate Scott’s identity to appease his lover. The trajectory of the story may become a tad familiar as drug addiction and a life-threatening illness consume the last chunk of the film, but this cast keeps it invigorating and moving along nicely.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Snow White: A Tale of Terror

Posted : 1 month, 3 weeks ago on 5 October 2014 05:40 (A review of Snow White: A Tale of Terror)

Despite the subtitle being A Tale of Terror, this version of Snow White is no more authentic to the Grimm’s fairy tale than the Disney version. Substituting musical escapades and cutesy sidekicks for muddled psychology and vague terror, Snow White: A Tale of Terror is a showcase for Sigourney Weaver’s great talents and nothing more.

The film begins with the birth of Snow White, here named Lilli Hoffman (Monica Keena), and the death of her mother. Normal enough, but A Tale of Terror has her mother dying in a carriage accident and her father (Sam Neill) cutting her out of the womb. It’s a needlessly shocking and violent opening, and like so much of the rest of the film a more interesting as an idea than in execution. We flash forward several years and find Lilli’s father has remarried the glamorous Lady Claudia (Sigourney Weaver). After nine years of marriage, Claudia becomes pregnant, Lilli a bratty teen, and their relationship fragments into darkness and jealousy after Claudia gives birth to a stillborn son.

The rest of the film follows the basics of the fairy tale. There’s a flight into the woods, the mistaken belief of her death, getting refuge from seven outcasts, the poisoned apple and glass coffin. However, none of the diversions are of much interest or explored in great detail. This version rejects the idea of the seven lonely men being dwarves, instead casting them as damaged men returned home from the Crusades. Except the main one is Gil Bellows at the height of his attractiveness with a poorly done scar to try and distract from his attractiveness, which it doesn’t. This idea of them being wounded soldiers from the Crusades also doesn’t gain much traction, nor does the vague mentions of class warfare and Christianity versus paganism. Although it is a campy delight to watch Weaver hang Neill upside down on a cross.

At the very least, A Tale of Terror has Weaver in the lead role. And aside from the handsome sets, strong makeup, and lovely costumes, she’s the only reason to watch this mess. She’s operating and performing at a higher level than everyone else, relishing in the campy theatrics. While Neill is wasted in his role, Kennar and Bellows are eye-catching but bland, Weaver manages to create an entirely realized character. Watching her take a piece of broken glass and threaten to kill Kennar is like watching All About Eve envisioned as a penny dreadful horror story. It’s in this isolated moments that the film becomes interesting, and when the camera decides to just sit back and lovingly watch Weaver act like a psychotic diva then it’s really cooking. Much like it’s titular heroine, Snow White: A Tale of Terror is pretty to gaze upon and nothing else.

0 comments, Reply to this entry

Masterpiece Theater: Great Expectations

Posted : 1 month, 3 weeks ago on 5 October 2014 05:39 (A review of Great Expectations)

It seems unfair to compare films based on a book to a mini-series based on the same book, or vice versa. Inevitably, there is always one version that is the most beloved and deemed the definitive filmed version of the novel. Any version of Great Expectations is doomed to try to bloom in the shadow of David Lean’s 1946 classic.

This version, which aired in the US on Masterpiece Theater, from 2011 is one that deserves more respect and a fair shake. Sure it suffers from similar problems as other adaptations of Dickens’ novel – bland leads for Pip and Estella being the main cause of concern – but it does take some interesting chances in parts.

On a technical level, this version of Great Expectations lays waste to many competitors. The production and costume design from the tiniest details to the exquisite close-ups are well thought out. Much attention has been paid to make it look real. These are dirty and dusty interiors, rooms and houses that have been lived in for generations that contain secrets. And the costumes are just gorgeous to behold. Miss Havisham’s wedding dress and crony make-up have never been so subtlety progressed before. Normally she arrives as a Grand Guignol madam, and here she is a strangely sympathetic broken woman using a young child to right her personal wrongs and launch a proxy vendetta.

And for covering so much expansive ground in so brief a time, three episodes that clock in at an hour each, the plot moves along relatively smoothly. The various characters and story strands merge and tear only to be mended as best they can. I wanted to spend a longer amount of time in this world, despite as well-known as it has become, because of the impressive technical aspects and the attention paid to the letter of the text. While I have never been a great fan of Dickens’ wandering prosaic style, I do appreciate that this series tried valiantly to keep as much of the immense scope intact as possible.

Yet it’s such a shame that we’re stuck with the pretty but bland Douglas Booth as Pip. I never believed in him as the naïve love struck son of a blacksmith. He’s far too delicately beautiful, with large brown eyes and soft pillowy lips that make him look a better fit for a model than a tortured young lover who must pick the pieces of his shattered dreams back up and move on. And Vanessa Kirby didn’t make much of an impression on me as Estella, a crucial bit of casting. I never felt the tortured, complicated fiery emotions within her, but she’s never bad, just decent enough. However, other casting choices are top notch. Ray Winstone as Magwitch is terrifically rugged and brusque. Harry Lloyd is an endearing and entertaining Herbert Pocket, and I wonder what would happen is Booth and Lloyd had switched parts? But I was most impressed with Gillian Anderson’s Havisham, a controversial choice on my part. Much of the critical response is split on whether or not she was a great fit for the part, arguing that she was too old or too sedate. But I found her to age appropriate for the role given that Havisham is described as being closer to middle-age than an elderly woman. And I found her sedate, disturbingly calm way to talking to be an effective mask for the bitter hurt and madness lurking underneath, things which she slowly lets slip out over time.

While I don’t think that David Lean’s film version has any reason to worry about this one taking its top spot, this version of Great Expectations is still damn fine in its own way. A solidly constructed period piece that closely adapts a classic novel with high production values and a (mostly) solid cast, what’s not to like?

0 comments, Reply to this entry


« Prev12 3 4 5 6 7 » 17 » 72 Next »


Movies

Favorite - View all
My movies page

Rated 955 movies

TV

Favorite - View all
My tv page

Rated 94 tv

Games

Top rated
My games page

Rated 19 games

Music

Favorite - View all
My music page

Rated 497 music

Books

Favorite - View all
My books page

Rated 222 books
Favorite Authors

DVDs

Top rated
My dvds page

Rated 11 dvds

My feed

JxSxPx posted a review of The Road

The Road

“Cormac McCarthy’s The Road is a devastating look at life after the destruction and collapse of organized civilization, and a moving look at the lengths one father will go towards keeping his son safe. Told with the simplicity and power of Biblical language, the novel is alternately profoundly movi” read more

6 hours, 10 minutes ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Traffic

Traffic

“Traffic takes a look at the War on Drugs through a prismatic lens – focusing equally at their source, the public, federal government, and the U.S. border. Some stories are more interesting than others are, and the entire film is awash in needlessly artsy cinematography. Each story has its own dist” read more

6 hours, 10 minutes ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Easy Rider

Easy Rider

“I don’t mean this in a snide or mean-spirited way, in fact this isn’t a criticism at all, but Easy Rider is like an encapsulation of the late 60s counter-cultural movement played out in microcosm. A pure distillation of the concerns, thoughts, and bacchanal of that generation’s ennui played ou” read more

6 hours, 10 minutes ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Safety Not Guaranteed

Safety Not Guaranteed

“Safety Not Guaranteed is one of those blandly smug indie films that suddenly turn cloyingly earnest in the end, wanting to play it both ways. Granted, I found some of the tone and treatment of Mark Duplass’s character to be generally questionable throughout, turning him from a deeply emotionally d” read more

1 day, 6 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Capote

Capote

“There are many ways to tackle a celebrity biographical film, typically they lean hard on the “greatest hits” approach, presenting a series of vignettes that don’t add up to a complete portrait or point-of-view as to why this artist mattered. Instead these films gloss over everything that went ” read more

1 day, 7 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Bugsy

Bugsy

“A tiny bit of a mess, Bugsy wants to be both a quiet character study, a loud mafia epic, and a portrait of a doomed love affair, while winding up being mostly a damn fine entertainment. Much of that credit goes to leading man Warren Beatty, a notoriously picky star who hasn’t made as many films as” read more

1 day, 7 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Vincent & Theo

Vincent & Theo

“Vincent & Theo was originally a miniseries for European television, and the film product suffers from being truncated. One gets the sense that many of the twists, turns, and slowly building character development and biographical details would be better served in their original format. Not that the f” read more

1 day, 7 hours ago
1 week, 3 days ago
JxSxPx posted a image

2 weeks ago
JxSxPx added 6 items to their collection
As I Lay Dying: The Corrected Text

owned

The Road

owned

10/10

Crimson: Redemption - Tome 4

owned

8/10

Crimson: Earth Angel - Tome 3

owned

8/10

Crimson: Heaven & Earth - Tome 2

owned

8/10


2 weeks ago
Interstellar
 Interstellar 9/10
2 weeks, 2 days ago
3 weeks, 4 days ago
Tetro
 Tetro 8/10
3 weeks, 5 days ago
3 weeks, 6 days ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Behind the Candelabra

Behind the Candelabra

“Steven Soderbergh’s work offers the biggest charge when he sits back and watches as professional commitments and messy private lives loudly crash into each other. Some of the best moments in Traffic are when Catherine Zeta-Jones’ pampered wife goes from bored housewife to cutthroat queen of the ” read more

4 weeks ago
The Big Chill
 The Big Chill 6/10
4 weeks, 1 day ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
The Great Outdoors

have watched

6/10

Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

5/10


1 month ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
The Fifth Child (Paladin Books)

8/10

Of Mice And Men

9/10


1 month ago
Three Ages
 Three Ages 9/10
1 month ago
Stage Door
 Stage Door 10/10
1 month, 2 weeks ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
A Trip to the Moon

10/10


1 month, 2 weeks ago
Bob
 Bob's Burgers 10/10
1 month, 2 weeks ago
JxSxPx added 1 item to Favorite TV Shows list
Bob

1 month, 2 weeks ago

Snow White: A Tale of Terror

“Despite the subtitle being A Tale of Terror, this version of Snow White is no more authentic to the Grimm’s fairy tale than the Disney version. Substituting musical escapades and cutesy sidekicks for muddled psychology and vague terror, Snow White: A Tale of Terror is a showcase for Sigourney Weav” read more

1 month, 3 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Great Expectations

Masterpiece Theater: Great Expectations

“It seems unfair to compare films based on a book to a mini-series based on the same book, or vice versa. Inevitably, there is always one version that is the most beloved and deemed the definitive filmed version of the novel. Any version of Great Expectations is doomed to try to bloom in the shadow o” read more

1 month, 3 weeks ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Buffalo Girls

Buffalo Girls

“With prestige borrowed over from the combination of novelist Larry McMurtry, producer Suzanne de Passe, and star Anjelica Huston, Buffalo Girls perhaps had too much baggage to ever truly be great. But it could have turned out better than this middling effort.

Buffalo Girls tells the spraw” read more

1 month, 3 weeks ago
Americano
 Americano 6/10
1 month, 3 weeks ago

« Prev12 3 4 5 6 7 » 17 » 69 Next »

Comments

Posted: 1 year, 1 month ago at Oct 26 17:23
Posted: 1 year, 7 months ago at Apr 8 14:36
hi friend check out my new list .
hope you like it and thanks for your
time
http://www.listal.com/list/love-these-posters
Posted: 1 year, 8 months ago at Mar 30 14:02
This might just sound schize, but thanks for re-writing my "Pocahontas" review-- saves me the trouble of figuring it all out *again* myself, a-hahahaha....
Posted: 1 year, 8 months ago at Mar 18 22:57
Thanks for participating in my lists.
Sorry, but you can't do another top, really sorry.
But thanks.
Posted: 1 year, 8 months ago at Mar 10 18:22
Thanks for taking part in my musicals list!

I also know how you feel, I found it hard to limit my choices down to 10.
Posted: 1 year, 10 months ago at Jan 19 23:47
hey friend check out my new list. hope you like it
http://www.listal.com/list/reflecting-beuty
Posted: 1 year, 11 months ago at Dec 21 16:14
Hello there! I enjoyed your review of Dracula and took myself the freedom to link it to my Universal Horror Films - Best to Worst list. Hope you're fine with that!
Posted: 2 years, 4 months ago at Jul 21 2:52
Thank u 4 your comment on the muses list. Suggestion added.
Posted: 2 years, 10 months ago at Jan 27 21:05
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members

(I may have asked you this already earlier, in this case, apology for the inconvenience!)
Posted: 3 years, 4 months ago at Jul 16 13:06
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members
Posted: 4 years ago at Nov 18 1:19
O.O Thanks!!
Posted: 5 years, 10 months ago at Jan 12 20:17
cool reviews =]
Posted: 6 years ago at Nov 15 17:51
Posted: 6 years, 3 months ago at Aug 12 18:48
Hey man, I see you're pretty new, I'm loving the reviews though! Great job.