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JxSxPx

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I'm Jason. I'm a film, literary and pop culture enthusiast. Got a soft spot and deep love for animation, comics and nerdy things that go in tandem with them.

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Recent reviews

All reviews - Movies (501) - TV Shows (48) - Books (3) - Music (118)

Snowpiercer

Posted : 3 days, 6 hours ago on 29 July 2014 04:53 (A review of Snowpiercer)

Leave it to a foreign director working with an international cast and adapting a French graphic novel to make the most audacious and intelligent science-fiction film in a long time. It’s a downer of a film, frequently diverting into absurd territory, punctuated by moments of satire and unafraid of balancing out poetic images with brutal violence. It may not always smoothly traverse the different tones or twists and turns in the story, but I give it high-praise for even bothering to try it out.

Rarely does a film emerge from the hands of the Weinstein Company without numerous edits and obvious bits of interference. So a round of applause is in order to Korean director Boon Jong-Ho for sticking it to them and demanding that his original vision without compromises or edits make it to the screen. That he won is a wonderful bit of kismet, but the downside was Harvey Weinstein’s wrath – dumping the film with a small scale release and limited promotion.

Pity, this film deserves to find a larger audience. I loved every moment of its audacious choices, whether or not they turned out to be fully formed ideas or half-formed sketches is beside the point. Snowpiercer is a film that makes a never-ending train ride to nowhere in particular seem like its own brand of hell, and exactly like our current political and social landscape. As the Have-Nots struggle and try to revolt for a piece of the Haves, the film echoes various revolutions and uses that ideology to slowly unfold a darkly satiric film.

The only true point at which the film threatened to lose me was when we came upon the conclusion to the story, which ended up in a different location than I thought it was willing and ready to go. If the film had ended with the destruction of the train, Snowpiercer would have had more philosophical impact and allegorical weight. The only way to save humanity at this point would be to destroy the existing structures and start again. But it continues to go on, and that ending is a bizarre choice which feels too hopeful and optimistic for such a downbeat movie. It didn’t torpedo the film for me, but it did take some of the varnish off of it.

Jong-Ho has assembled an interesting cast, and I mean that as high praise. Each of them brings a unique voice and tone to the film, even if a few them aren’t given much to do, they bring a certain spark or energy to their scenes. The mixture sees Oscar winners (Octavia Spencer, Tilda Swinton), living legends (John Hurt, Ed Harris), character actors (Jamie Bell, Ewen Bremmer, Luke Pasqualino), and a few international stars (Ah-sung Ko, Kang-ho Song, Emma Levie). Alison Pill shows up in a single scene, one that is so gonzo and brilliant that it may just be the highlight of the film. Pill’s uber-perky facial contortions lead into a shootout, and she sells the hell out of the material while simultaneously making the case that she needs to be given bigger, better roles in the future. (Of course, I felt this way after her scene-stealing in Scott Pilgrim and Midnight in Paris.)

But Snowpiercer’s greatest asset is Chris Evans. Best known for playing Captain America in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Evans is really developing a talent for playing conflicted heroes who lead the troops into battle. Of course, Marvel would never let Evans go as dark in those films as he does here. Maybe Snowpiercer will be the film that cements Evans as more than a pretty face (and body, but I digress…). A monolog late in the film sees Evans pour out year’s worth of guilt and resentments, and he’s mesmerizing to watch. Even better is a climactic scene in which he is tempted to become the new head of the ever-moving train, abandoning his mission and joining the 1% at the very top of the food chain. You can see his breakdown of everything he’s ever believed, every piece of faith in his revolution and mission, that moment of great temptation in which our savior may very well indeed go dark.

What Snowpiercer lacks in subtlety, which is doesn’t even bother with by and large, it makes up for with a sense of imminent danger and unpredictability. It’s almost cruel how quickly it dispenses with characters who seem like they’re destined to make it to the final reel, frequently killing them off in ways that are indifferent or indistinct before realizing that, yes, that character truly did die. Swinton’s callous minister reminds them that they must always know and keep their place, and her character is practically the symbol for the entirety of the film’s political allegory. She is misplaced superiority, a violent moral authority, and severely lacking in compassion, she wouldn’t seem out of place at a Tea Party rally or delivering quips on Fox & Friends.

It used to be that science-fiction took modern day problems and reflected and refracted them in strange, intelligent ways. Somewhere along the way it turned into lasers blowing shit up in the space real pretty, and while that can have its charms, it’s exhausting when year after year that is the only meal option being given to you. It was exciting to see 2014 give us smart comic book movies in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, a monster-fest in Godzilla, but I think Snowpiercer will be the one to go the distance in the end. Inch by tenuous and hard-fought inch, we climb forward in the train, wondering what strange vision will greet us next. While the ending may be a strange place to exit the journey, what a ride it was to get there.

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Muppet Treasure Island

Posted : 3 days, 6 hours ago on 29 July 2014 04:53 (A review of Muppet Treasure Island)

It’s nearly impossible to mess up a film with the Muppets, especially one that simply plugs them into an already existing story like in Muppet Treasure Island. That doesn’t mean every single movie is going to be golden, and Muppet Treasure Island is definitely a bronze medal entry.

There’s a few funny gags, and the musicals numbers are filled with the same sense of anarchic glee even if they’re in service of unmemorable songs, and Tim Curry hams it up with his brand of over-the-top braggadocio. Yet there’s still a certain spark missing from Muppet Treasure Island, and I can’t quite put my finger on what it is. Maybe it’s just an overall feeling of a weaker script? There is nowhere near enough Miss Piggy for my tastes. Gonzo and Rizzo can make for a lively duo when effectively used, but the script doesn’t want to give them enough winking humor and fourth-wall breaking gags. Billy Connolly and Jennifer Saunders are both horribly underutilized, despite giving it their all in their too brief time on screen.

So praise be to Curry for out-acting and over-emoting the entire lot of Muppets every chance he gets, because he’s a real livewire here, consistently giving the film energy and life whenever its gags fall flat or timing feels off. A Muppet movie is a formula that can’t fail, but that doesn’t mean it always succeeds. Instead we get varying levels of good, for every classic (The Muppets or The Muppet Movie), we get oddball entries that aren’t bad, but they aren’t the Muppets at their brightest either. Here is one of those movies.

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Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Posted : 3 days, 6 hours ago on 29 July 2014 04:53 (A review of Close Encounters of the Third Kind)

I know I’m going to get plenty of side-eyes and comments telling me that I’m crazy, but I just don’t see what’s so great about Close Encounters of the Third Kind. I find much of it interminably dull, it’s depiction of aliens at odds with itself, but it’s saved by impeccable craft and a great leading performance from Richard Dreyfuss.

I think the main problem with Close Encounters is that none of the main characters are terribly compelling or fleshed out enough to wrap me up in their supposed complex emotional states. They speak and act in goopy mystical exchanges, any depth doesn’t come from within their characters as written but from the plot machinations as needed. Even then, only Dreyfuss as Roy Neary really gets anything juicy to chew on as an actor. The plot is thin, at 135 minutes it feels padded and like it could use a quick edit to tighten up its structure, and the characters are even thinner.

But it just seems such a strange choice to depict the actions of a man who goes dark, becomes obsessed with the possibility of flickering lights in the sky, practically cheats on his wife, and then abandons them to run off with the aliens in the end as one of child-like wonder and spectacle. Terri Garr’s suffering wife is a badly needed dose of reality, and once she exits for saner living situations, Close Encounters goes head-first into the story of a selfish man who abandons his loved ones for a possibility of extraterrestrial life. Having been a child abandoned by a father for dubious reasons, I don’t see much amazement, sympathy, or wonder in that choice.

Nor do I truly see a consistent presentation of the aliens. By turns they are kindly, coming in peace during the climatic moments, yet they also kidnap a child from a frantic mother desperate to keep him locked inside. No reason is given for why the aliens have chosen these people, or this particular time, to reveal their existence, but I’m not sure one could be given that is satisfactory. A moment of doubt or judgment on Dreyfuss’s sanity as a character would be most welcome, but the film plays it sympathetic to him at all times. I will grant Close Encounters a refreshing choice of making the interaction between extraterrestrial life and ours a peaceful one instead of one of violence and planetary conquest.

For all of my problems with the story choices of Close Encounters, one cannot impeach its craft. The special effects are still wondrous after nearly 40 years. The aliens themselves are unimpressive, but the spaceships are idiosyncratic and seem to lack basic human concepts of engineering, always a smart choice. And John Williams offers an emotional highpoint with his score, reminding me that there was a time when he was one of the best in the business long before he began to repeat himself. For me, Close Encounters can’t compare to the thrill-house adventure rides of other Spielberg works like Jaws, Jurassic Park, or Raiders of the Lost Ark. It’s a terrific bit of movie-making technique, but that’s about all it is for me.

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Planet of the Apes

Posted : 3 days, 6 hours ago on 29 July 2014 04:53 (A review of Planet of the Apes)

Numerous classic films that have been canonized more for their historical import than their long-lasting merits. One such example of this phenomenon is Planet of the Apes, one of Charlton Heston’s many jaundiced, deeply cynical science-fiction action-adventure films which try extra hard to work as deep political allegories. Apes fares better than many of those films, but it still suffers from numerous problems that leave it just missing the unimpeachable classic mark.

With numerous sequels, remakes, and a currently popular rebooted franchise in theaters, does one really need to summarize or explain the basic plot of Planet of the Apes? Scientists on a space mission in 1972 crash land on a foreign planet and learn that the year is 3978. Upright talking apes run the planet, humans are enslaved and largely mute creatures reverted down to a feral state, Heston can only look on at the madness and rage against it. The writers use this topsy-turvy world to explore issues of science versus religion, race relations, and man’s confusion over technological progression and destruction.

None of it is particularly subtle, much of it boldly stated and with clunky dialog, cardboard thin characters, and uneven pacing that has the film oscillate between intriguing setups and long passages of awkward doldrums. Far too much of the film is eaten up by these moments in which the human characters stare soulfully into the barren, harsh landscape, or give vaguely meaningful looks to each other while their ape masters coldly treat them like test subjects or decorations. This wouldn’t be a problem if any of the human characters were even remotely interesting, but none of them are. Linda Harrison is nothing but pin-up mute babe material in a fur bikini, while Heston must contort and grimace with wild abandon, demanding answers for this strange world order and its secrets.

Far better are the three main ape characters – kindly Zira (Kim Hunter), sympathetic Cornelius (Roddy McDowell), and villainous Zaius (Maurice Evans). Emoting as best they can through Justin Chambers’s makeup, the three of them make the most lasting impression in the film, the ending image notwithstanding. Chambers makeup is another aspect of the film that gives it greater weight than it might otherwise deserve. To be blunt – it doesn’t hold up as well it should. For the time, this was a big bang, a huge evolutionary leap forward in the art of special effects makeup, but seen today these designs appear clunky, barely mobile, and like they were from the same mold. Facially, despite being different species of apes, none of them appears to be radically different from each other, only when you add in costuming and the voices of the various actors do their personalities come alive.

Yet Hunter, McDowell, and Evans seem to realize that there’s a certain amount of camp to the proceedings and go from there. Evans in particular seems to have great pride and relish in the opportunity to swing wide with his characterization. Hunter was an underrated actress, watch The 7th Victim or her Oscar winning work in A Streetcar Named Desire for proof, who was blacklisted and didn’t get the film opportunities her talents deserved. Here she manages to emote the strongest through the makeup, frequently appearing to be empathetic to Heston’s plight and the most intellectually curious about him. McDowell makes a lasting impact for his peculiar vocal presence alone, combined with his moral conflict over what to do about this strange talking human.

In many instances, Planet of the Apes feels like a two hour long episode of The Twilight Zone, for good and bad. It’s a strong premise, and frequently manages to craft movie magic with its pop culture landmark moments and strong performances, but the script never feels the need to make the characters more compelling or the dialog smoother. Yet none of this matters when we get to the ending scene, a moment so infamous that I’m not even sure there are people out there who don’t know what it is, whether or not they’ve even seen the film. If an ending can make or break a movie, then Apes stuck a difficult landing and got the gold despite its faults in performance up to this moment. I still think the film is a classic, but it’s not a masterpiece.

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Our Town

Posted : 1 month ago on 30 June 2014 11:04 (A review of Our Town)

Thorton Wilder’s play is an indomitable classic, a work that twisted and contorted the very fabric of stage dramatics during its time. So why is the movie version so damn underwhelming? It’s never terrible, but it mostly stalls out at serviceable. Maybe because it decides on largely being a filmed document of the play rather a cinematic adaptation of it. Or maybe it’s just because certain conceits work better on stage than in film – the narrator is never fully integrated into the plot, nor is the minimalism of the production design. Think of it either way, the point is, Our Town doesn’t ever work as a film.

Our Town is a led by Martha Scott, in her film debut, and William Holden, in one of his earliest roles. Scott was inexplicably Oscar nominated for her turn here, which is never truly great nor terrible, just merely workman-like. That she bested, say, Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday for recognition is baffling. And Holden is awkward in these All-American boy-next-door parts, he soared once Billy Wilder got his hands on him. Everyone else does fine work, but I’ve seen all of them perform better in other films.

Artifice and sentimentality are the primary means of operation in Our Town. The main problem with this is simple: sentimentality in order to be effective must be earned, which Our Town never properly does. Artifice in a film, especially one from the studio era, is to be expected. Modern films don’t speak this romantic language as fluently. And Our Town’s insistence on giving the story a happy ending is baffling and confusing. The brilliance of the play was that the third act took such a sudden departure into the surreal and embraced darkness. The film only commits to this change halfway, which is a good enough summary for the film adaptation as a whole.

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Svengali

Posted : 1 month ago on 30 June 2014 11:04 (A review of Svengali)

By most accounts, this is a psychological drama with numerous horror film trappings but Svengali never finds a comfortable setting. Loosely based on George du Maurier’s novel Trilby, this film adaptation sees John Barrymore take on the titular role of an obsessive hypnotist with his sights set on a nude model, Trilby. Barrymore is deliciously hammy in the role, and the film has a few moments of divine inspiration, but it’s mostly just amateur-hour.

To have been truly effective, Svengali needed a strong actress in the role of Trilby to sell the overarching drama. Marian Marsh is not that actress. Almost cringe inducing and precocious in the first few moments, she finally settles into a more endurable mode once the darkness creeps into the plot. But Barrymore blows her off the screen, and Marsh’s presence never provides a visible or logical reason for so many different men to be obsessed with her.

While clearly in debt to German Expressionist cinema, Svengali is mostly all look and no emotional excavation. Unlike, say, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari which utilized its topsy-turvy sets to describe the main character’s tenuous emotional state, Svengali gives its characters a pleasing set and no thoughts or emotions to play out. Only on a few occasions towards the end does the film manage to scrap together some interesting ideas. A late-night psychic call-out from Svengali to Trilby sticks in the mind. Svengali is across town, but calls out to her, and the camera pans out from his apartment clear across the rooftops before resting on the sleeping Trilby. This sequence lingers in the mind for its imagination and for displaying the obsessive nature at the heart of the story. But that is Svengali in summary: brilliant tiny moments surrounded by wooden and indifferent film-making.

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The Iron Mask

Posted : 1 month ago on 30 June 2014 11:04 (A review of The Iron Mask)

What a shame that the main print available for The Iron Mask is the 1952 re-release that added an oppressive voiceover. If viewed in its original silent incarnation, I have the strongest feeling that it would be a vast improvement. But 1929 was the year of The Jazz Singer, and silent films were numbered. The Iron Mask feels like it should be the closing image of Douglas Fairbanks legendary career, and alternately like a great icon feeling uncertain about his place in the upcoming new all-talking world of cinema.

The Iron Mask is a sequel to one of Fairbanks’s great films, The Three Musketeers, and a speed-read through Alexandre Dumas’s novel The Victome of Bragelonne: Ten Years Later, most popularly known for the segment dubbed “The Man in the Iron Mask.” This film reunites many of the supporting players from the 1921 Musketeers, and their various death scenes play like goodbyes to old friends. The Iron Mask also features Fairbanks fighting to maintain his swashbuckling persona, while acknowledging that his reign as king may be over, as this film features his lone death scene in the silent era.

And it would be a fitting, if bittersweet, farewell to the original king of daring adventure cinema if not for Douglas Fairbanks Jr.’s decision to include a voiceover for his re-released version. The images play out in the heightened reality of silent film, and narrating their every move, thought and action creates a strange dissonance between what is happening onscreen and having it spoon-fed to use. The poetry and grace of silent acting and it’s dream-like logic is undercut and the film never recovers. Yet there is Fairbanks in the center of it all, holding the film together and saying goodbye to his throne and still promising greater adventures beyond this point summarized in one of the final images of the film – the Musketeers reunited in heaven and walking into the great beyond.

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Harold and Maude

Posted : 1 month ago on 30 June 2014 09:40 (A review of Harold and Maude)

You can look at me like I’m crazy all you want, but I find Harold and Maude to be an utterly charming picture of unconventional love. Granted, it’s unconventional love story is really a device used to tell us that life is worth living, and to do what makes you happy while you’re living it. How anyone could not be completely charmed by this strangely whimsical story of a young death obsessed boy and an elderly woman with a lust for life?

Director Hal Ashby and writer Colin Higgins are non-judgmental in presenting both of these individuals and exploring their relationship together. Essentially presenting a generational conflict and finding the ones in power to be suffering from a type of emotional malaise. Harold may be obsessed with death and prone to theatrical displays of this obsession, but at least he isn’t his mother so enamored and slavish to bourgeois comforts.

Our empathy lies perfectly square with Harold and Maude, a yin and yang if there ever was one. And much of the genius lies in the casting of Bud Cort and Ruth Gordon. Cort’s wide-eyed stare perfectly encapsulates the winking suicidal tendencies of Harold. Even when smiling, which is only in brief moments, Cort appears to be frowning internally, and constantly appears to be marching towards an unseen funeral. Whereas Ruth Gordon, who quietly steals the movie which is only fitting given her character is a kleptomaniac, is pure energy and sunny disposition. Here is woman who can stare life and/or death in the face, and greet it with a big smile.

The two of them meet up while crashing a funeral, and their strange friendship blossoms from there, slowing turning from a meeting of kindred spirits and polar opposites, at the same time. There human connection is the very heart of the film, underscored by Cat Stevens score. A collection of pop songs which work in much the same way as a regular orchestral score would, Stevens uses his pop songs to underline the drama, or to add some levity to an otherwise macabre world.

While the world of Harold and Maude may be a strange one, there is still a shimmering innocence and sense of hope, a longing to make a connection. This idealism is what I think makes the movie so lasting as a cult film. Here is a film which doesn’t judge its two characters, and even presents them as the happiest and most normal person in the entire thing. Harold’s mother is obsessed with him repeating the process of marriage and middle-class domesticity, and his series of dates frequently culminate him staging a new bizarre death and his mother’s indifference to his neurosis, viewing it more as a nuisance than anything else. Ashby clearly wants us to understand that this lifestyle isn’t for Harold, maybe it isn’t even for you, and that’s fine. This is a fable of love and death which tells us happiness is a personal thing, and however you chose to define it is something worth fighting for.

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Bull Durham

Posted : 1 month ago on 30 June 2014 09:40 (A review of Bull Durham)

Romance, sex, religion, baseball, Bull Durham argues that they’re all one and the same. This isn’t some story about a Major Leaguer or a scrappy up-start; this is a down and dirty look at those stuck in the part-time. Jamming together equal parts sports movie with romantic comedy, Bull Durham finds the great American pastime in lusty and robust health.

Bull Durham gets a lot right, so we can forgive it, even embrace it, when it starts to play out like the fantasies of the writer. The braggadocio and salty language of the locker room feels real and lived in. The fact that this movie gives the lie to the “healing powers” of the sport is wonderful, showing instead how the obsession begins to overcome all other aspects of their life. Who cares if a poetry reading incredibly sexy baseball whisper/groupie is pure invention, I say thank god for her. Annie Savoy is a great character, and probably the most interesting one of the three leads.

Kevin Costner’s wise veteran is a salt-of-the-earth type, while Tim Robbins’s cocksure upstart pitcher is pure mush-brains, buts it’s Susan Sarandon’s Walt Whitman quoting seductress that walks away with the movie. Her character could have easily dipped into a sad case study of someone unable to face the march of time, but Sarandon gives Annie a spark of life and a genuine love for all things baseball. Her one love affair a season, during which she teaches the prospective players how to be great, is of course complicated by the presence of Costner. That the film is a love triangle as much as it is a knowing love letter to baseball should clue you in to where everyone lands in the end.

Yet it’s still a satisfying journey with these three people. Sure, Robbins is pure comic gold as the dumbest and least interesting of the three, but he’s still worth spending time with as he transitions from braggart to someone of more substance, if not too much more mind. It’s only mildly ironic that Robbins and Sarandon began their decades long love affair, because she and Costner have an erotic spark that threatens to ignite the celluloid every moment that they’re in the same frame. These are great people to spend time with, ones, who have had hard knocks done to them by life, but still find great love and joy in their shared passion.

But Bull Durham is considered one of the best sports movies because of the minor key moments which ring as truth. Minor League players being dropped and promised coaching jobs as a cushion for the harsh impact feel lived in. These type of acute observations only make the film more enjoyable and warm. It’s easy to forgive, even ignore, that the movie may be running a tad too long and getting a little flabby as it rushes towards its ending, but dammit it’s hard to say goodbye to these characters and the genuine amount of love and respect the film has for its subjects.

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A Fistful of Dollars

Posted : 1 month ago on 27 June 2014 08:29 (A review of A Fistful of Dollars)

A Fistful of Dollars sees Sergio Leone first dips into the Spaghetti Western, and his first teaming with Clint Eastwood. It is to watch Leone’s later operatic, stylistic obsessions and choices to be in their embryonic form. It is to watch Eastwood’s film persona being hammered into place and his movie star charisma coming into full bloom. Sure, the plot is purely recycled from Akira Kurosawa’s Yojimbo, which was already heavily borrowed from Dashiell Hammett’s great noir novel Red Harvest, but A Fistful of Dollars is a loose remake done right.

It may not quite hold its own weight next to sprawling masterpieces like Once Upon a Time in the West or The Good, the Bad & the Ugly, but it’s still a damn good time. The extreme close-ups, the dirt and grit in every frame, the poetic expressions of violence, the long-silence punctuated by loud gun shots, the Ennio Morricone score that haunts every moment – all of Leone’s genius is here. And if you’re interested in pure expressions of cinema, films which alternate between wide panoramas and tightly framed faces, Leone’s oddball westerns are a great deal of joy to behold.

These are Westerns beamed in from another planet, keener on providing expressionistic shots of wide landscapes and punctured by operatic displays of emotions and goofy sidekicks that pose as comic relief. Standing in the center of Leone’s great, loosely entwined trilogy is Eastwood’s “Man with No Name.” His granite face and permanent squint are visual symbolizes that what we’re dealing with is a murky area in which there are no longer clear delineations between good and bad. Eastwood is pure anti-heroism, and the stoic yet ultimately decent heroes of John Wayne and Gary Cooper’s westerns are now things of the past.

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JxSxPx added Easy Rider to have watched list
8 hours, 44 minutes ago
1 day, 15 hours ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
Donnie Brasco

have watched

7/10

The Rainmaker

7/10


2 days, 12 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Snowpiercer

Snowpiercer

“Leave it to a foreign director working with an international cast and adapting a French graphic novel to make the most audacious and intelligent science-fiction film in a long time. It’s a downer of a film, frequently diverting into absurd territory, punctuated by moments of satire and unafraid of” read more

3 days, 6 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Muppet Treasure Island

Muppet Treasure Island

“It’s nearly impossible to mess up a film with the Muppets, especially one that simply plugs them into an already existing story like in Muppet Treasure Island. That doesn’t mean every single movie is going to be golden, and Muppet Treasure Island is definitely a bronze medal entry.

Th” read more

3 days, 6 hours ago

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

“I know I’m going to get plenty of side-eyes and comments telling me that I’m crazy, but I just don’t see what’s so great about Close Encounters of the Third Kind. I find much of it interminably dull, it’s depiction of aliens at odds with itself, but it’s saved by impeccable craft and a g” read more

3 days, 6 hours ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Planet of the Apes

Planet of the Apes

“Numerous classic films that have been canonized more for their historical import than their long-lasting merits. One such example of this phenomenon is Planet of the Apes, one of Charlton Heston’s many jaundiced, deeply cynical science-fiction action-adventure films which try extra hard to work as” read more

3 days, 6 hours ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
The Pianist

have watched

8/10

The Mill and the Cross

9/10


3 days, 9 hours ago
The Messenger
 The Messenger 8/10
1 week, 5 days ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
Behind the Candelabra

have watched

9/10

Muppet Treasure Island

6/10


2 weeks, 3 days ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
Lena Horne At Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer: Ain

owned

10/10

Stormy Weather

10/10


2 weeks, 5 days ago
Saratoga
 Saratoga 5/10
3 weeks, 3 days ago
Snowpiercer
 Snowpiercer 9/10
3 weeks, 4 days ago
1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Our Town

Our Town

“Thorton Wilder’s play is an indomitable classic, a work that twisted and contorted the very fabric of stage dramatics during its time. So why is the movie version so damn underwhelming? It’s never terrible, but it mostly stalls out at serviceable. Maybe because it decides on largely being a film” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Svengali

Svengali

“By most accounts, this is a psychological drama with numerous horror film trappings but Svengali never finds a comfortable setting. Loosely based on George du Maurier’s novel Trilby, this film adaptation sees John Barrymore take on the titular role of an obsessive hypnotist with his sights set on ” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of The Iron Mask

The Iron Mask

“What a shame that the main print available for The Iron Mask is the 1952 re-release that added an oppressive voiceover. If viewed in its original silent incarnation, I have the strongest feeling that it would be a vast improvement. But 1929 was the year of The Jazz Singer, and silent films were numb” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Harold and Maude

Harold and Maude

“You can look at me like I’m crazy all you want, but I find Harold and Maude to be an utterly charming picture of unconventional love. Granted, it’s unconventional love story is really a device used to tell us that life is worth living, and to do what makes you happy while you’re living it. How” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Bull Durham

Bull Durham

“Romance, sex, religion, baseball, Bull Durham argues that they’re all one and the same. This isn’t some story about a Major Leaguer or a scrappy up-start; this is a down and dirty look at those stuck in the part-time. Jamming together equal parts sports movie with romantic comedy, Bull Durham fi” read more

1 month ago
1 month ago
JxSxPx posted 5 images [View All]

1 month ago
Party Monster
 Party Monster 6/10
1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of A Fistful of Dollars

A Fistful of Dollars

“A Fistful of Dollars sees Sergio Leone first dips into the Spaghetti Western, and his first teaming with Clint Eastwood. It is to watch Leone’s later operatic, stylistic obsessions and choices to be in their embryonic form. It is to watch Eastwood’s film persona being hammered into place and his” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Marathon Man

Marathon Man

“Marathon Man is an awkward marriage between political/espionage thriller and Nazis-on-the-loose chiller. There are moments of sublime horror and some great acting on display, but the film is ultimately undone by its instance on being more important or better than it actually is. There are large swat” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx posted a review of Harry and Tonto

Harry and Tonto

“My praise and criticism of Harry and Tonto reside in the same place: Art Carney’s central performance. At once, Carney pulls this film away from generic TV Movie of the Week platitudes through sheer force of will, but it’s not a performance of transcendence. His Oscar win feels like a “Give it” read more

1 month ago
JxSxPx added 2 items to their collection
The Rat Race

have watched

6/10

Here Come the Girls

6/10


1 month ago

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Comments

Posted: 9 months, 1 week ago at Oct 26 17:23
Posted: 1 year, 3 months ago at Apr 8 14:36
hi friend check out my new list .
hope you like it and thanks for your
time
http://www.listal.com/list/love-these-posters
Posted: 1 year, 4 months ago at Mar 30 14:02
This might just sound schize, but thanks for re-writing my "Pocahontas" review-- saves me the trouble of figuring it all out *again* myself, a-hahahaha....
Posted: 1 year, 4 months ago at Mar 18 22:57
Thanks for participating in my lists.
Sorry, but you can't do another top, really sorry.
But thanks.
Posted: 1 year, 4 months ago at Mar 10 18:22
Thanks for taking part in my musicals list!

I also know how you feel, I found it hard to limit my choices down to 10.
Posted: 1 year, 6 months ago at Jan 19 23:47
hey friend check out my new list. hope you like it
http://www.listal.com/list/reflecting-beuty
Posted: 1 year, 7 months ago at Dec 21 16:14
Hello there! I enjoyed your review of Dracula and took myself the freedom to link it to my Universal Horror Films - Best to Worst list. Hope you're fine with that!
Posted: 2 years ago at Jul 21 2:52
Thank u 4 your comment on the muses list. Suggestion added.
Posted: 2 years, 6 months ago at Jan 27 21:05
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members

(I may have asked you this already earlier, in this case, apology for the inconvenience!)
Posted: 3 years ago at Jul 16 13:06
I'm working on a new project. Maybe you can check it out and help me. From which State are you from? and in which State are you living right now?

http://www.listal.com/list/around-usa-listals-members
Posted: 3 years, 8 months ago at Nov 18 1:19
O.O Thanks!!
Posted: 5 years, 6 months ago at Jan 12 20:17
cool reviews =]
Posted: 5 years, 8 months ago at Nov 15 17:51
Posted: 5 years, 11 months ago at Aug 12 18:48
Hey man, I see you're pretty new, I'm loving the reviews though! Great job.